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Schwab IMPACT 2020 Video

Our CEO, Jeff Sarti, was featured at Charles Schwab’s virtual IMPACT conference. Thousands of investment advisory professionals gathered remotely to learn how to think differently about the issues that matter most to their practices. This year Schwab highlighted four firms based on the impact they are making in the industry. In a year that has brought so much change, we are honored to be chosen.

Watch the video below as Jeff shares his personal thoughts on serving our clients during these uncertain times.

Sharkpreneur Podcast featuring Jeff Sarti ‘Growing to $2 Billion AUM’

Morton Capital CEO Jeff Sarti joined host Seth Greene on the Sharkprenuer podcast this week to talk about growing Morton Capital to $2 billion in assets under management.

Here are some of the key takeaways from this podcast:

  • Why people should view their wealth as more than just a number.
  •  How building a portfolio for the correct economic season is vital.
  • Why real estate investments allow people to be more conservative if necessary.
  • How they include real estate as assets under management at Morton Capital.
  • Why diversifying portfolios is important for people who are investing.

Thank you to Kevin and Seth for allowing us to share this segment of your podcast. We encourage listeners to head to MarketDominationLLC.com to hear more insightful episodes of Sharkprenuer episodes.


About the Podcast:
The Sharkpreneur Podcast was founded by Kevin Harrington and Seth Greene. On the podcast, Kevin and Seth interview SharkPreneurs who share straight talk on what it takes to explode your business.

About the Hosts:
Kevin Harrington is the inventor of the infomercial, one of the original sharks from the hit tv show shark tank, and has generated over 5 billion dollars in TV and digital direct response sales.

Seth Greene is the world’s #1 trusted authority on cutting edge direct response marketing, a best-selling author, the only 3x Marketer Of The Year Nominee, and the founder of http://www.MarketDominationLLC.com

Guest:
Jeff Sarti, Morton Capital, Chief Executive Officer


Disclosures

Information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only, and should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any individual security or asset class. The views expressed are those of the author and are subject to change without notice.

Certain private investment opportunities may only be available to eligible clients and can only be made after careful review and completion of applicable offering documents. Private investments are speculative and involve a high degree of risk. References to specific investments and performance information contained herein are for illustrative purposes only. This is not a representation that the investments described are suitable or appropriate for any person. 

Winners of InvestmentNews’ Best Places to Work are selected based on surveys voluntarily completed by employees and employers of participating firms.  Scores from the employee survey represent three quarters of the weight of the final rankings. To be eligible for the award firms must be a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer; be in business for at least one year and have at least 15 full-time employees.  Firms do not pay a fee to participate in the survey process or rankings.

Past performance is not indicative of future results. All investments involve risk including the loss of principal. Details on MC’s advisory services, fees and investment strategies, including a summary of risks surrounding the strategies, can be found in our Form ADV Part 2A. A copy may be obtained atwww.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

MC Stories – Eliminating Capital Gain Tax on the Sale of an Appreciated Asset Through the Use of a Charitable Tax-Exempt Trust

For many investors, a barrier to diversifying their portfolio is the impact of losing 25% of their profits if they sell a highly appreciated asset. If you are charitably inclined, that barrier can be eliminated by using a tax-exempt trust, as outlined by the following example:

Let’s assume you have a highly appreciated asset (perhaps stock or real estate) that you paid $200,000 for, and that has a market value of $1,200,000. Your capital gain would be $1,000,000. If you sold that asset, you’d only have about $950,000 to reinvest after paying 25% of your gain in taxes (approximately $250,000). By using a tax-exempt trust you would have the full $1,200,000 to reinvest.

    Here’s how it works:

  1. You establish this trust prior to selling the asset. The terms and provisions of the trust are established at its inception. Prior to selling the asset, you transfer the asset to the trust. You and your spouse (if married) become income beneficiaries for your lifetimes to the trust. The IRS sets a range of “approved interest rates”; let’s say 5% per year.  So, in year 1, the trust will distribute an income to you of $60,000 ( 5% of $1,200K). If the trust earns a return of greater than 5%, your income the next year will go up. But the big advantage is that you have $1,200,000  to invest, rather than the $950,000. Additionally, you can be your own trustee, so that the investment decisions and control of the assets are retained.
  2. Why does this trust qualify to be tax-exempt? Primarily there are 2 reasons:
    1. The trust is irrevocable, so once established, it cannot be modified.
    2. A t the death of the last income beneficiary, the remaining balance of the trust is paid to a 501c3 charitable organization (the legal name of this trust is a Charitable Remainder Trust). An additional benefit is that upon transferring the asset(s) to the trust, you receive an immediate charitable income tax deduction for the “present value of the future interest” of the “gift”. Depending on the age(s) of the income beneficiary and the established interest rate, the deduction can be in the range of 25% of the gift. So, in this example, instead of paying $250K in capital gain taxes immediately, you’ll SAVE $100K in income taxes as a result of the charitable deduction.

   The main disadvantages of this arrangement are:

  1. Lack of liquidity. You do not have access to principal; only the income that the trust distributes. If you are dependent on the principal from the sale proceeds for your lifetime/retirement, this may not be the best strategy for your cash needs.
  2. At the death of the last income beneficiary, the money is not retained by your heirs. That “negative” can perhaps be eliminated through the use of a life insurance policy (the premium will be substantially less than the capital gains taxes you, otherwise would have paid). However, for those investors where this trust makes sense, this technique allows them to fulfill their charitable wishes, and normally, this is only a “piece of their estate” so the balance of their net worth will be distributed to their chosen heirs.
  3. While the earnings and gains in the trust are tax-exempt, the income that is distributed from the trust to the income beneficiaries is generally taxed.

The above is only meant to be a concise summary of this strategy. You should consult your financial advisor, tax professional or attorney to obtain more information. Tax rates used in this article are for illustrative purposes only and may not apply to your unique situation.

 


Disclosures:

This information is presented for educational purposes only, is hypothetical in nature and does not represent actual clients. The information presented is not written or intended as financial, tax or legal advice, and may not be relied on for purposes of avoiding any federal tax penalties under the Internal Revenue Code. Use of this information is not a substitute for legal counsel, and Morton Capital makes no warranties with regard to information contained herein. You are encouraged to seek financial, tax and legal advice from your professional advisors before implementing any transactions and/or strategies concerning your taxes or estate plan.