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MC Stories – Banking 101 – College Edition

Do you remember your first day of college? That feeling of excitement combined with trepidation at the idea of embarking on this new adventure that will eventually lead to a new career as well as financial independence? Now, do you also remember the day you had to open your first checking account – one that did not have your parents as joint co-owners? Well, that day might have been less exciting, but it probably held equal amounts of apprehension. In my first assignment as a branch manager in a small college beach town, they allowed me to work closely with students and I soon realized how ill-prepared they were to be on their own – financially speaking. I too was a college student once and so I wanted to share the top four things a young adult should consider before they open their first bank account.

  • Know what makes each financial institution different. When I started looking for a job in the banking world, I assumed all banks were the same. Most people have the same approach when it comes to doing their banking. Know that you have options! Online tools make shopping for a bank easy. Things you’ll want to research and compare include fees, interest rates, online and mobile monitoring options, branch proximity and ATM locations.
  • Know what fees you can anticipate. Banks charge fees – and lots of them. Using another bank’s ATM? Picked the wrong checking account and now you are paying monthly fees? How about that savings account? There is a limitation to how many withdrawals or transfers you can do a month – the number is six – before fees get assessed. And my favorite… “ I can’t be out of money – I still have checks!” Make sure that when using your debit card or paying your bills online, you do not exceed your ability to pay for them. In the event you forget, the bank won’t and you’ll be charged non-sufficient funds or overdraft fees.
  • Know what you need. Remember that talk your parents had with you about “wants” versus “needs”? Well, that conversation definitely comes into play here. You should only borrow what you absolutely need. The banker will eagerly want to sell you on a credit card, but from my personal experience, stick to a secured credit card as that will not only help build up your credit score but it will also help not overspend due to its small credit line. Most students are not great at budgeting and recovering from bad credit or handling repayment due to high-interest rates is no fun.
  • Know how to pay yourself first. By paying yourself before others, you are building the habits and discipline it takes to gain peace of mind with an emergency fund, saving for large purchases, and invest for long-term wealth building. First, start with a savings account – preferably not at the same bank as the one you have your checking. Next, set up an auto-transfer between your accounts on a monthly basis. This will kickstart your emergency savings account.

Regardless of where you are in this process, I leave you with this: research, read the fine print, and track your spending. Happy Banking!

MC Stories – Eliminating Capital Gain Tax on the Sale of an Appreciated Asset Through the Use of a Charitable Tax-Exempt Trust

For many investors, a barrier to diversifying their portfolio is the impact of losing 25% of their profits if they sell a highly appreciated asset. If you are charitably inclined, that barrier can be eliminated by using a tax-exempt trust, as outlined by the following example:

Let’s assume you have a highly appreciated asset (perhaps stock or real estate) that you paid $200,000 for, and that has a market value of $1,200,000. Your capital gain would be $1,000,000. If you sold that asset, you’d only have about $950,000 to reinvest after paying 25% of your gain in taxes (approximately $250,000). By using a tax-exempt trust you would have the full $1,200,000 to reinvest.

    Here’s how it works:

  1. You establish this trust prior to selling the asset. The terms and provisions of the trust are established at its inception. Prior to selling the asset, you transfer the asset to the trust. You and your spouse (if married) become income beneficiaries for your lifetimes to the trust. The IRS sets a range of “approved interest rates”; let’s say 5% per year.  So, in year 1, the trust will distribute an income to you of $60,000 ( 5% of $1,200K). If the trust earns a return of greater than 5%, your income the next year will go up. But the big advantage is that you have $1,200,000  to invest, rather than the $950,000. Additionally, you can be your own trustee, so that the investment decisions and control of the assets are retained.
  2. Why does this trust qualify to be tax-exempt? Primarily there are 2 reasons:
    1. The trust is irrevocable, so once established, it cannot be modified.
    2. A t the death of the last income beneficiary, the remaining balance of the trust is paid to a 501c3 charitable organization (the legal name of this trust is a Charitable Remainder Trust). An additional benefit is that upon transferring the asset(s) to the trust, you receive an immediate charitable income tax deduction for the “present value of the future interest” of the “gift”. Depending on the age(s) of the income beneficiary and the established interest rate, the deduction can be in the range of 25% of the gift. So, in this example, instead of paying $250K in capital gain taxes immediately, you’ll SAVE $100K in income taxes as a result of the charitable deduction.

   The main disadvantages of this arrangement are:

  1. Lack of liquidity. You do not have access to principal; only the income that the trust distributes. If you are dependent on the principal from the sale proceeds for your lifetime/retirement, this may not be the best strategy for your cash needs.
  2. At the death of the last income beneficiary, the money is not retained by your heirs. That “negative” can perhaps be eliminated through the use of a life insurance policy (the premium will be substantially less than the capital gains taxes you, otherwise would have paid). However, for those investors where this trust makes sense, this technique allows them to fulfill their charitable wishes, and normally, this is only a “piece of their estate” so the balance of their net worth will be distributed to their chosen heirs.
  3. While the earnings and gains in the trust are tax-exempt, the income that is distributed from the trust to the income beneficiaries is generally taxed.

The above is only meant to be a concise summary of this strategy. You should consult your financial advisor, tax professional or attorney to obtain more information. Tax rates used in this article are for illustrative purposes only and may not apply to your unique situation.

 


Disclosures:

This information is presented for educational purposes only, is hypothetical in nature and does not represent actual clients. The information presented is not written or intended as financial, tax or legal advice, and may not be relied on for purposes of avoiding any federal tax penalties under the Internal Revenue Code. Use of this information is not a substitute for legal counsel, and Morton Capital makes no warranties with regard to information contained herein. You are encouraged to seek financial, tax and legal advice from your professional advisors before implementing any transactions and/or strategies concerning your taxes or estate plan.

MC Stories – Wearing Multiple Hats

If I were to ask you how many hats do you wear, what would your answer be? For me, I wear the hats of wife, mom, Associate Advisor, and student. Unfortunately, time does not expand the more hats you wear. So how can we juggle the different roles that we are in? It is important to have separate environments for each of the roles that you have. One of the hardest things to do is to keep work at work. Not all our jobs allow us to take our work hat off completely. However, it is important that when we work from home, we have a dedicated space for doing so. Even though it is easy to take a laptop from room to room, it blurs the lines between roles.

I have found the following tips useful in helping me be fully present in each role:

  • Have separate spaces: It is important to have separate environments for each of the roles that you have. One of the hardest things to do is to keep work at work. Not all our jobs allow us to take our work hat off completely. However, it is important that when we work from home, we have a dedicated space for doing so. Even though it is easy to take a laptop from room to room, it blurs the lines between roles.
  • Dedicate your time specifically: This advice has been the most helpful for me. If you look through the pictures of this post, I shared my schedule. On weekdays, I dedicate my mornings to my family, 9am-5pm to work, 5pm-7pm to my kids before they go to bed, then I have time for school. This way, I can focus on each role individually rather than being overwhelmed with everything that needs to get accomplished in each role all at once. 
  • Communicate your schedule and ask others to hold you accountable: Unless I have a meeting or school assignment that takes me out of my normal scheduled time, my family knows that when it’s 5 o’clock, they can come into my office and help me transition to family time. I think this is important because it makes them feel just as important as the work I was doing during the day. I also set these guidelines with my peers at work so they are confident that I will be responsive and reliable during my work hours. 
  • Schedule things to look forward to in each role: Sometimes our schedules can become monotonous. It is important to schedule things to look forward to in each role. My oldest daughter and I have hot chocolate every Saturday morning. When I am bogged down by a busy work week or demanding school assignment, the thought of Saturday morning helps me push through it.

Many of us may not realize how many hats we truly wear. However, the current environment is challenging the “norm” and highlighting the different roles we all play.  What hats do you wear? Which of these tips do you think would be useful for you? The next time you start feeling overwhelmed by how much is on your plate, take a moment, breathe, and make sure you aren’t wearing too many hats at once.