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MC Origin Stories – Sarah Ellis

What was the turning point for you in deciding to change careers?

 

What lessons have you learned from your past work life that you’ve brought to MC?

One of the key phrases I have kept with me over the years is one I learned from my first “real” job working at the local BBQ restaurant. Plastered on the wall to the left of the kitchen entrance was: “Work with a sense of urgency and always anticipate the guest’s needs.” This is a mantra I live by to this day, in all aspects.

I prefer to work quickly, yet efficiently, and I find so much value in taking a moment to think about all the “what-ifs” to ensure I am asking questions that haven’t even been answered yet. The best compliment I can receive is when someone says, “Wow, you beat me to the punch. I was just about to ask you that!”

 

Empowering a customer or client is something many of us hope to achieve in our work. What opportunities have you had to accomplish this in the past?

For me, this goes back to the saying, “Give a man a fish, and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he will eat for a lifetime.” Being an overthinker, I always challenged this saying with follow-up questions: What if the person is too squeamish to put bait on the hook? What if the person doesn’t know how to swim if his boat gets turned over? What if he doesn’t have the resources to buy the fishing line and reel? What if he sets everything up right, but the fish are just not biting?

There is so much more that goes into empowering than just teaching. You must provide someone with the tools to accomplish the task well—the physical tools (bait, line, reel), the skillset tools (how to swim, how to drive the boat, how to overcome the aversion to baiting the hook), the learning tools (what is their learning style: doing, watching, listening?)—and in a way that makes sense for them. Empowering does not just teach someone to do something, but actually makes the person believe they can do it and do it well.

One of my favorite examples of this is with the daughter of a current client at our firm. Her mom wanted to start educating her about an irrevocable trust that was set up for the daughter when her dad passed away. Rather than just giving her access to the account (give a man a fish), or even just educating her on what a trust is, how to access the funds, and how to invest the funds (teach a man to fish), we spent time talking to her about her interests and her goals for her life. We did educate her on the basics of a trust and investing, but we took it a step further and explained the pros and cons of knowing the amount of money she had access to. We then put it back on her to make the decision to know how much was in the account or not. For some people, knowing that you have access to a large sum can actually be a demotivator. At the beginning of the conversation, she said she valued her work ethic and her pursuit of her passions. Would knowing that she had access to an inheritance cause her to sit on her laurels and not pursue those passions? We empowered her to make the decision and she actually chose not to know what the balance was. I was proud of her, not for the decision she made, but because she made that decision herself. She now has ownership of her life and goals. She knows she can ask for the balance at any time, but she made the decision that empowered her best to achieve her life goals and feel proud of her accomplishments.

The Societal Duty of Businesses: Happiness, Meaning, and Fulfillment for Your People

 

Before becoming the Chief Operating Officer, my primary role at Morton Capital was as a financial advisor. In 2017, I was working with a prospective client who ran a non-profit in Northern California. We were having a discussion about her life and wealth goals and began chatting about her role as the leader of an organization. I asked her to share her favorite aspect of leading the non-profit organization and she quickly said, “The dinner table conversations.” I was immediately confused but asked her to describe what she meant. She said, “As a leader, I am responsible for making sure my team finds meaning in the mission of the organization, is fulfilled in their career and ultimately goes home to have positive dinner conversations with their families.” I was blown away by this story and it transformed my views on leadership. Most books, articles, and podcasts define leadership as being about the processes and the people. And when it comes to the people, research typically focuses on boosting productivity and engagement within the organization. But in reality, the impact of leadership goes beyond the four walls of the business. The people leaders work with go home to family and friends, and they bring whatever energy they felt during the day home with them. Sadly, according to the most recent workplace studies, 40% of people are not bringing positive energy home; they are stressed and unhappy. I believe this is why my prospective client highlighted that her most important role was to impact dinner table conversations.

It’s been four years since that meeting and upon further reflection, I asked myself, “Does the influence leaders have on their people have to end at the dinner table?” The more I have researched, the more I am convinced it does not. If people are treated well at work, they will be happier, and studies show that happier people will be less stressed and kinder towards others. This made me ask the next question, “If we had kinder people in our society, could we create real change within society at large?” There are some obvious benefits to fostering a kinder society, such as better relationships and less depression. But a lack of kindness is also a root cause of more complex societal issues, such as political divisiveness, racism, animal cruelty, and shootings. These issues are obviously multi-faceted, and I am not proposing that kindness is the singular solution; but I am proposing that it can tilt the scales.

In the same way we ask the education system to influence better behavior in children, I believe it is fair to ask that workplaces do the same for adults. In fact, the workplace is probably one of the most influential places due to the simple fact that it is where we spend most of our waking hours. If leaders saw it as their societal duty to provide their people with fulfilling, happy careers, the trickle-down effect could be meaningful.

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Leaders are the new teachers

I should note that there is not much research on how workplaces impact society, so I have been digging into other sources to support this thesis. I mentioned earlier that 40% of people are stressed, unhappy or dislike their leader. This means that almost half of the people you meet had negative experiences that week. There is also research on the impact of positive “energies” vs. negative “energies,” and what the studies found is that these energies are learned behaviors. This means that unless there is a medical reason, people are not born unkind, they learned that behavior. So, there is an opportunity to help teach people how to be kinder and happier through positive relationships. These positive relationships can actually change your physiological health for the better by lowering your blood pressure and arming individuals with a heightened ability to navigate stressful situations. We’ve actually seen proof of this in classrooms when observing teachers who approach their students with positivity instead of negativity. Think about your favorite teacher growing up. What are the key attributes of that person? I’m guessing you thought of words like empathetic, caring, thoughtful, individualized teaching, etc. Likely when an issue arose in the classroom, that teacher didn’t say,  “why are you this way?” but rather “what habits have you learned that led to this behavior and how can I help you learn a new behavior?” The research shows that children who were approached with empathy in this manner are happier, and ultimately more successful. In my opinion – as adults – workplaces are just the new classrooms and leaders are the new teachers.

Be aware of cultural disruptors that prevent happiness

Cultural Disruptor #1: “It’s them, not me”

This is the most common excuse I hear from owners of companies who are not interested in taking on the societal responsibility of helping people be happier. What’s ironic about this excuse is that the business itself will likely suffer the most from this attitude. The most frequent example of this is when leaders complain to me about the “millennials” that work for them. They “want it now,” are “entitled,” and are “lazy.” My first response to them is “know your audience”, as I am a millennial myself, and second, “what led you to the conclusion that they are the problem?” Mark Sylvester referenced this issue on his TEDx covering problem solving. He said, “everyone wants a one-click solution to solve their problem, but it’s your problem to solve and your reward to receive.” Instead of pointing at millennials as the problem, if we started asking them what they desire in a workplace to be successful, we would learn that they have several needs. They desire to have a plan, need help building confidence, and want their company to be relevant. These seem like fairly reasonable requests, especially if they are asking to grow as individuals and contribute to the company. We have to remember that millennials are the first generation that grew up being told how “special” they are, but might not actually have the confidence to make meaningful “special” contributions to the company. Many people are not lucky enough to have attentive parents, or thoughtful mentors. In the absence of those role models, leaders should assume that part of their job is to empower people to be confident in themselves.

Cultural Disruptor #2: “There isn’t enough time to help people be happy”

The difficult part about this disruptor is that time is a precious commodity and asking leaders to give more time to their people can feel like a big ask. But we have to remember that while founders start companies, they don’t usually build businesses alone. People build businesses, so shouldn’t we spend time building up people? This means teaching people the skills that they need to be successful. And when they aren’t successful, we should be asking questions to get to the heart of the issue so they can learn from their mistakes. For example, whenever there is an issue, leaders can use the following three-question system: 1) what could I have done differently? 2) what could the individual have done differently? 3) are there any processes/systems that need to change to be more successful in the future? Using these three questions will help people feel supported and not fearful that they alone are to blame when mistakes inevitably happen. Sometimes the goal of helping people be happier can actually be accomplished just by helping them feel safer.

Cultural Disruptor #3: “Blind loyalty”

Every time someone tells me one of their core values is loyalty, I am equally thrilled they have this value and become cautious because loyalty can turn into blind loyalty in an instant. This blind loyalty causes businesses and organizations to keep people in leadership positions who are posing obstacles to a firm’s progress. For example, let’s say you run a family business and Uncle Dave is in charge of the sales team. Over the past 2 years, you have experienced 25% turnover in that department, and in exit interviews, people have expressed that they didn’t feel empowered by Uncle Dave. You chatted with Dave about this a few times but have been reluctant to fire him because he is “family.” This is the same story I hear when people in leadership have “been with the company for 20 years and it’s too late to change them”, so we just keep dealing with their negative energy/leadership style. This type of blind loyalty resulting from nepotism or company tenure, is detrimental to organizations and should be dealt with or avoided at all costs because your people are watching you tolerate this behavior. This tolerance will cause trust to slowly diminish within the organization, lead to increased gossip/turmoil, and undermine the mission of promoting happiness in your people.

Cultural Disruptor #4: “Throwing money at the problem”

There is ample research showing that money is not the best tool for truly motivating people. However, it is generally the easiest solution that requires the least amount of energy and thoughtfulness. In the short term, using money to motivate people or promote happiness will probably work. However, in three months, people tend to forget about their raise/bonus and revert back to habits that do not promote the business or workplace wellness. Leaders need to use a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to develop their people. Intrinsic motivation tends to be more feelings-based – i.e., feeling that their boss cares about them, or they are proud of the mission of the company, or the culture is awesome. Extrinsic motivation is generally about compensation and benefits. Both are important, but intrinsic motivators are best for long-term happiness and growth.

How organizations can influence change

1) Be curious about trust

It will be difficult for any organization to make progress if they have not taken time to address where a lack of trust exists within an organization. Trust is tricky because there are no simple solutions. In a podcast with Esther Perel, a renowned psychotherapist and author, she discussed trust and quoted a philosopher who  said, “Trust is a risk masquerading as a promise,” which is a profound concept. We often ask people to trust us because of our history or expertise, but what we are really asking is for people to take a risk on us. This is a bigger commitment than we may realize and takes a significant amount of effort on the part of the other person. To truly create a culture of trust, I recommend reading two books simultaneously – the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and the 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership. Start with the first few chapters of the 15 Commitments so that your mindset is open and committed to learning. Then read the Five Dysfunctions with 3-6 leaders within the organization. There are some great practical applications in the book that will help any organization understand where a lack of trust is negatively influencing the business. At Morton Capital, we decided to take a year off from growth in 2018 to focus on trust and it was the best decision we could have made. Now, conversations around trust are normalized within our company and we more quickly and openly address issues that inevitably arise.

2) Develop career pathing that increases engagement

An increase in engagement is correlated to happiness and fulfillment. One of the most important ways to foster engagement is to create clear career paths for every employee within the organization. In order for these career paths to be effective, they need to both be scalable and customized. Start by creating general career paths within the organization that outline the qualitative and quantitative skills necessary for an individual to make progress. The qualitative skills should reflect the values of the company, emphasize respect for colleagues, and highlight the importance of learning. Then, survey team members to find out how they want to contribute and add value to the organization. If they have questions about their options, dig in and have in-depth discussions about the potential career paths within the organization. When their goals are clear, meet with team members regularly to develop customized timelines to help them contribute to the organization in a way that will grow the company and create career opportunities. This is especially important in a remote workplace, where managers will have to adopt “goal-based” leadership vs. “presence-based” leadership to measure success. In addition, create an educational program to help people grow their workplace skills (such as organizational or goal-setting skills) and their technical knowledge to scale learning and development. According to workplace surveys, this level of engagement/happiness results in an average of 21% higher profitability than unengaged organizations.

3) Have a vision people will rally around

Simon Sinek recently published a book called “The Infinite Game” where he proposes that all organizations should have a ‘just cause’ that influences the behaviors and vision of the company. This helps people find meaning in their work and do something that is ‘for others’ instead of just for the sake of making money. In our organization, we have a mission of “empowering better investors through education” with the goal of helping people make better financial decisions that align with their values. By working for the benefit of others, we are able to be clear about our company goals and strategies, leading to a better client experience and a vision that inspires our people.

Leaders can inspire people to be better members of society

It’s been said that leaders need to lead by example and be the change they want to see. When I think about my own career – starting as a wedding planner, then a barista, followed by fitness instructor, an operations administrator, financial planner, advisor, and now COO/business owner – I can certainly say that I would not have made it this far without leaders who believed in me and saw the importance of workplace happiness. Our CEO, Jeff Sarti, will openly share that one of his top priorities for our company is creating an organization where people love coming to work. This statement, along with his humble confidence, empathy, and positive leadership, gives our entire team motivation to continue pushing forward the mission of the company. This energy causes a boomerang effect, inspiring our firm’s leadership to empower our team so that they are fulfilled in their careers, bring positive energy into their dinner table conversations, and are kinder members of society.

 

To see research/references mentioned in this article, click here.

To view Stacey’s TEDx conversation on “The Societal Duty of Businesses,” click here.

Disclosures:

AUM information as of 12/31/2020. Morton Capital is an SEC registered investment adviser; however, such registration does not imply any level of skill or training.  Our disclosure brochure (Form ADV Part 2A) contains detailed disclosures regarding our services and fees, along with applicable conflicts and how we address such conflicts.  A copy can be obtained upon request or at http://www.adviserinfo.sec.govwww.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

 

 

 

MC Origin Stories – Joe Seetoo

1) What opportunities have you had to accomplish this in the past?

 

2) What personality traits do you believe have set you up for success at Morton? 

1) Passion for Learning
“I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it.” — Picasso
I can remember at a young age my father saying, “Education is something no one can ever take away from you” and “knowledge is power.” I believe his views were shaped by his father, a Chinese immigrant who had escaped the horrors of communism in the late 1930s/early 1940s and fled to the U.S. I’ve adopted a less Machiavellian approach to learning, one that is founded more in a naturalistic belief that we as humans have a proclivity towards growth and expansion. I am constantly reading and learning new things, everything from psychology to neurolinguistic programming to guitar scales. I believe learning allows us to cultivate aspects of ourselves that we might otherwise overlook.

2) Organized/Structured
I still make my bed every morning (okay—6 days a week), my calendar is color-coded, and I can’t go to sleep with a messy house. Given the volume and speed of information, we are required to process in today’s environment, staying organized can be a challenge. I believe having routine systems and processes (i.e., habits) in place both personally and professionally reduces the cognitive load on the brain, which can lead to mental fatigue. By reducing my decision fatigue related to mundane but necessary tasks, I’m able to free up more space for deep work with our clients. Naturally, many clients have scattered random questions and concerns that feel disjointed even though they relate to their financial affairs. They are challenged to organize their thoughts and are stuck in analysis paralysis. I’m able to help organize their thoughts and formulate an action plan that allows them to move forward. And, if I’m being honest with myself, organization gives me the illusion of control. If I’m operating from a place of peace, my ability to listen carefully to a client’s question or concern and respond in a thoughtful manner increases exponentially.

3) Empathy
“We are all just walking each other home.” — Ram Dass
Easing the burden of our fellow man is part of what we do as humans. We are wired to be social creatures. I’m a deeply spiritual person. There is a level of emotional intimacy that evolves over the life of a relationship between an advisor and a client because money is one gateway to many other aspects of our lives. Ensuring our families and loved ones are taken care of, sending our children to college, buying a new home, and having the ability to retire are all major milestones in the human experience. For many, money is an emotional topic because it represents our hopes and concerns about what we want in our lives. Being able to put myself in my client’s shoes in the moment and see where they are coming from helps foster trust and open lines of communication.

 

3) How have your career aspirations changed over the years leading to this point?

I’ve been in wealth management since 1998—over 22 years. I am 44. Early in my career, I was determined to become an advisor. I elected to obtain the Chartered Financial Analyst® charter in the early 2000s. I continued down the path of becoming the best advisor I could by completing the CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ designation in 2008 in addition to coursework on behavioral finance and advanced estate planning. In 2014, I was blessed with the opportunity to become a partner at Morton Capital and work more closely with senior leadership, not only as an advisor but also as an owner. Our company has grown to over 50 teammates responsible for more than $2 billion in assets as of 12/31/2021. We have 13 owners/partners.

More recently, I have been focused on broadening the scope of our expertise in a few key areas:
Exit Planning—I am committed to helping owners maximize the value of their greatest asset: their business. As part of my journey and being involved in a Generation 1 to Generation 2 succession plan at Morton Capital, in the summer of 2018, I completed a designation called the Certified Exit Planning Advisor, sponsored by the Exit Planning Institute. By experiencing firsthand what many current business owners and next-gen owners will deal with, I believe I can use my knowledge both as a financial planner and owner to help improve outcomes. To that end, in July 2020, I launched the Conejo Valley Chapter of the Exit Planning Institute https://exit-planning-institute.org/chapter/epi-conejo-valley-chapter/. It’s a forum for advisors and owners to share knowledge and best practices related to business succession planning.

Additionally, I have recently launched a podcast called The Ripcord Moment, where we interview owners (and their advisors) who have made the jump and what pearls of wisdom they can share with owners contemplating a sale/transition at some point in the future. These firsthand experiences are a powerful tool to help shape more successful outcomes for other owners.

Mentoring and Recruiting—I’m passionate about what we do at Morton Capital and have been able to help recruit a number of talented professionals to our organization over the years. I am committed to making Morton Capital an even more resilient firm. I enjoy mentoring our talented staff and helping them become the best versions of themselves.

MC Origin Stories – Thao Truong

1) What was the turning point for you in deciding to change careers?


After I left England, I moved to the United States. I just wanted to accelerate my college education and finish it quickly so that I could start making money and be my family’s savior. I moved to the States for more affordable options. I attended a community college in Seattle and graduated from the University of New Hampshire. I decided to study finance, hoping that the degree would give me the knowledge on how to become rich sooner.  While in school, I tried to make money from several different channels, started a few different businesses with friends, and invested in options and penny stocks. But like what your advisors would normally tell you: “Don’t try to beat the market.” I lost money from those risky moves.  Looking back, what helped get me through my hardships were: (1) the support from friends; (2) my personal emergency fund (which I had before my family hit rock bottom); (3) discipline for a long-term financial plan; and (4) my stable college jobs like tutoring in economics, financial accounting and statistics, and being a teaching assistant for microeconomics. During my last two years of college, I worked as an economic forecasting analyst for a professor at my university, and then as one of the 35 financial analyst students specially selected to manage the university’s endowment. Then, through working with affluent clients in the wealth management business, I slowly discovered that I had put the wrong attention on MONEY matters. Prosperity and happiness are far beyond money. There is also knowledge, health, and mental wellness. Financial planning is not about getting rich, it is about long-term planning for your money so it works for your values.

 

2) What lessons have you learned from your past work life that you’ve brought to MC?

 

3) Empowering a customer or client is something many of us hope to achieve in our work. What opportunities have you had to accomplish this in the past?

I believe in the power of financial literacy. I want to be able to extend my knowledge to others who do not have the means. I strive to promote financial literacy to the public by providing free financial workshops for my local community. I also volunteered with San Diego Junior Achievement to promote financial literacy to middle school and high school students. I was an active member of the Financial Planning Association (FPA) and the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA). I co-founded a small women-advisor-only study group that is comprised of younger minority advisors. We have learned the power of having a community of friends and peers to turn to for advice and support. I was humbled and honored to be a recipient of the 2019 Diversity and Inclusion Scholarships for both FPA and NAPFA. These awards were granted to professionals willing to demonstrate and act upon an intense desire to affect the diversity of the financial planning profession.

MC Stories – Set it and Forget it

That sound you heard earlier in April, all across America, was the clattering of knives and letter-openers, dropped to the floor by retirement age investors staring at their quarter-end 401(k) statements. What had gone wrong with their “set it and forget it” investment plan?

The “set it and forget it” rhyming aphorism is one among of a bounty of rhymes that give our brains an easy path to perceived truth. These easy paths are known as heuristics, where one might take a shortcut to an answer — when time or interest or resources do not allow for a deeper dive. The first one we all learned was, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away”. Later, on the golf course we were told, “Drive for show, putt for dough”.

This tendency to view rhyming statements as more truthful is known as the Keats Heuristic, a term coined by two psychologists in a 1999 academic paper.* The term is drawn from Keats’ poem Ode on a Grecian Urn ,** wherein Keats concludes, “Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” — where a prettier image or prettier language is perceived to be truer. Academic studies have shown that where two phrases possess similar meanings, a rhyming one will be perceived as
carrying more truth:

“Woes unite foes” is an easier path to the brain than “Woes unite enemies”.

“What society conceals, alcohol reveals” trumps “What society conceals, alcohol unmasks”.

Obviously, this cognitive bias has not gone unnoticed by politicians and corporate marketers. General Eisenhower’s Presidential campaign slogan was “I like Ike”. And before it went out of business in 2019, the Thomas Cook Travel Company’s catchphrase was “Don’t just book it, Thomas Cook it”….All of which leads us to the phrase the financial press has often used to describe Target Date mutual funds: “Set it and forget it.”

Target Date funds (TDF) are most often employed in retirement accounts such as 401(k) plans, where the investor aligns his or her TDF with an expected retirement date. For example, an investor who turned 45 in the year 2000 might have chosen a “2020 Target Date Fund” — 2020 being the anticipated year of age 65 retirement. A fund such as this would begin with a high allocation to the stock market in the early years, and then taper that equity allocation in favor of bonds as the expected retirement year approached. To quote Investopedia: “ The asset allocation of a target-date fund thus gradually grows more conservative as the target date nears and risk tolerance falls. Target-date funds offer investors the convenience of putting their investing activities on autopilot in one vehicle.”

A December 15, 2018 article on MarketWatch offered these comments on Target Date funds: “A good deal of the money in 401(k) accounts is ending up in target-date funds. In fact, more than half of 401(k) accounts hold 100% of their assets in target-date funds, according to third-quarter data from Fidelity Investments. Target-date fund are investments tailored to an individual account holder’s age and retirement year. It’s essentially a ‘set it and forget it’ strategy because the fund will automatically rebalance itself to align with the investor’s age.”

All that sounds good, but many “set it and forget it” investors retiring this year were shocked to see that their 2020 Target Date Fund was not really “conservative”. According to an April 9th Bloomberg News article, the three largest TDF providers — Vanguard, Fidelity, and T. Rowe Price — each had half or more of their TDF 2020 allocation in stocks. T. Rowe Price, at 55% equities, had the highest allocation, and the fund’s return from February 20th to March 20th was a loss of 23%. The loss figures have diminished somewhat in the intervening market rally, but the risk is that when a retiree sees his or her portfolio drop by almost a quarter, there is a panic moment when some retirees will (and some certainly did) cash out and lock in their losses. Had these funds been on a truly more conservative glidepath, the less extreme losses would more likely have kept the otherwise panicked investors in the game.

Even if it does rhyme, there is a certain inadequacy to any “set it and forget it” mentality, particularly when considering how complex and fast-paced the world has become. We see governments and Central Banks attempting new, and radical, responses to economic problems. Just so, thoughtful re-evaluation in the face of changing circumstances should be a part of anyone’s financial plan.

It really is incumbent upon investors to think about (or hire an advisor to help take that deeper dive as to) where we are in economic cycles. While there will always be a divergence of opinion about the future, it is a fact that the U.S. stock market coming into 2020 had had a 10-year bull market, the longest on record. And, as cycles actually do occur, one would have observed the above fact and might have reduced equity allocations — certainly on the eve of retirement and the phasing out of a full paycheck.

Bottom Line: When it comes to investing for retirement, the Keats Heuristic just isn’t realistic.

 

* https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304422X99000030
** https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44477/ode-on-a-grecian-urn

MC Stories – Gen Z’s American Dream

For most 20th century Americans, the goal was, have a house with a white picket fence, two kids and a dog named Spot. For their future, they imagined flying cars and holographic images, something you would see in a sci-fi film. For those born between the years of 1997-2015, known as Generation Z, the idea of the “American Dream” has completely evolved from what their parents and ancestors imagined as their measure of success. Today young adults experience a level of connectivity that influences their purchases, investment decisions, and overall interpretation of wealth. Holographic images are a reality, but video calls just seem to be more practical.

Technology Age

The way we communicate has come a long way from the ever famous, “You’ve Got Mail.” While email is still the most prominent form of communication in many professional settings, Millennials and, even more so, Generation Z use text messages and direct messaging as their primary form of communication. Platforms like Twitter have championed the distribution of information in bite-size formats like short passages, videos, and GIFs (brief collages of images and/or text). The rapid-fire of information impacts many decisions being made by young adults, whether they are aware of it or not. Furthermore, the demand for up-to-date information is even higher and affects businesses in all industries. There is now a generation that is not only concerned with their personal style and brand but also the cost to bring their vision to life.

Financial Literacy

Generation Z is regarded as more financially savvy than their big sibling Millennials. Since they were born to Generation X parents, comprised of the do-it-yourself “latch-key kids,” they were raised with the philosophy that nothing will be handed to them. Do your own research and make your own way is the mentality of Gen X. Sometimes the best-orchestrated plan does not work, and you need to have contingencies. That imprint from their parents is what birthed the determined and opinionated Generation Z. They view the world through their personal lens and that of their parents, who have experienced multiple market crashes and withering retirement savings. Gen X parents went to four-year colleges and got the well-paying job (then came the dotcom bubble) and moved out to the suburbs (just before the housing crisis) to start a family. They checked all the boxes in the American Dream checklist and still came up short on the scale of financial security. So, what does that mean for Generation Z?

Wealth Transformation

While previous generations caught on gradually, young adults today make swift moves to take control of their future. These adults have the option of being an “Influencer” as a full-time occupation, which essentially means being a celebrity of social media platforms like YouTube and Instagram. Generation Z has harnessed the demand for instant communication by sharing their opinions on everything over the internet. Coupled with the famous marketing and advertising revenue that businesses have generated for decades, you have yourself a cash cow. There is a level of investment that young adults are putting into themselves that was unheard of for earlier generations. If you can take out a personal loan for an iPhone, ring light, and the aesthetic backdrop of a performing artist’s dressing room, you may be better off now than someone who invested $200,000 in post-graduate education. Both roads are a path to potential success, but the value of success is dependent on the individual.

In Conclusion…

The metrics measure of success is different for every person. Generation Z is not immune to the feelings of financial insecurity, not measuring up to the success of their peers and having doubts about their future. Those feelings are a part of every generation’s coming- of- age story. The important part is to gain awareness along the way. Generation Z was set up for success in the sense that financial literacy is much more prevalent today. Tools to improve daily living or “life hacks” are readily available in a five-minute YouTube video, instead of an eight-week course. Education about how to protect your assets and ensure that you are growing your financial buckets with purpose are all tools that young adults already have in their knowledge bank. The final piece is living a healthy life with enjoyment and purpose. That means: Build bonds that deepen relationships with family and friends. Set goals with your circle and execute them so that the whole group improves their quality of life in this generation and the next. Please stay tuned for future articles about the impact that our culture has on the financial decisions of young adults and future investors.