Posts

MC Stories – Financing Life Insurance . . . with Debt?

America is a society that has become extremely comfortable with financing. It’s rare nowadays for someone to pay cash for large purchases like their home, a car, or education costs. It’s also, however, more popular than ever for people to finance small purchases. Credit cards are used to buy groceries, gas, meals, clothes—pretty much everything.

With such widespread comfort around debt, it’s not a surprise that it’s used to finance life insurance premiums as well. This strategy has, in fact, been around for over 20 years (even longer in the property and casualty marketplace). Life insurance premium financing is where an insured borrows money from a bank to pay their life insurance premiums. The borrower is then responsible for posting collateral for the loan and paying the interest on the debt.

Today, financing represents around 25% of all policy premiums for in-force insurance policies. However, many people still haven’t actually heard of premium financing before and it has to do with the history of the strategy. In the early 2000s, a time known as the “Wild West” in life insurance sales, premium financing was used incorrectly and with limited regulations. Many people lost money and got hurt by taking on investments that they didn’t fully understand. Because of the stigma and reputation of its past, premium financing remains out of the mainstream conversation for many.

Fast forward to today, where the pendulum has swung far in the opposite direction and premium financing is now under strict regulation. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners passed Actuarial Guideline 49 in mid-2015 to protect consumers from misleading illustrations by limiting the growth rate and by limiting the policy design options that advisors are able to use in marketing to their clients. Also, all carriers now require the insured to have skin in the game by posting collateral and/or paying interest on the loans.

With stronger protections in place, the benefits that make financing life insurance special are much more attractive: the guarantees and the flexibility and optionality of the design, both from the onset as well as throughout the life of the policy. Because of these guarantees, financing life insurance can be a lower risk strategy to compound your wealth. That’s why the fastest-growing segment for premium financing is high earners in their 30s–50s. Rather than purchasing insurance for a death benefit, investors are looking to maximize their investment growth and increase their wealth to establish a future tax-free income stream in retirement. With interest rates near all-time lows, the benefits of using debt in a thoughtful way have never been greater.

But, as with any investment strategy, premium financing has additional risks not present when purchasing a policy without financing, such as having enough liquidity to post collateral, interest rate risk, and market risk. Financed life insurance should be considered for someone who has a need for a large-premium life insurance policy or is interested in compounding their wealth. Specifically, for business owners, financing should be considered as a smarter way to protect their company with a buy/sell agreement or key-person policy while keeping more cash available for other ventures within their business. If the business is a C-corp, there are even greater strategies to amplify the benefits. Given the nature of premium financing, it’s recommended that you consult your professional tax and legal advisors before purchasing a financed policy.

In my role as a financial advisor at Morton Capital, I collaborate with our internal financial planning team as well as outside insurance professionals to review and evaluate our clients’ life insurance policies. Although we don’t get paid for selling insurance, reviews are an integral part of ensuring our clients have the appropriate risk coverage and are taking advantage of investment opportunities when they align with their goals and risk tolerance.

 

Disclosures:

This information is presented for educational purposes only, and should not be treated as tax, legal or financial advice. This information should not be taken as a representation that the strategies described are suitable or appropriate for any person. All investments involve risk, including the loss of capital. You should consult with your insurance professional to thoroughly review all information and consider all ramifications before making any decisions regarding your insurance coverage.

 

 

Schwab IMPACT 2020 Video

Our CEO, Jeff Sarti, was featured at Charles Schwab’s virtual IMPACT conference. Thousands of investment advisory professionals gathered remotely to learn how to think differently about the issues that matter most to their practices. This year Schwab highlighted four firms based on the impact they are making in the industry. In a year that has brought so much change, we are honored to be chosen.

Watch the video below as Jeff shares his personal thoughts on serving our clients during these uncertain times.

MC Stories – 4 days, 450 miles in a 4-wheeler

How often do we get the chance to really get away from it all and unplug? With the stresses of modern-day life—raising two children, my wife, Jen, and I working full-time—I was looking forward to a “guys trip.” Now, mind you, this was not with my friends but rather an L.A.-based group called Wilderness Collective, which runs UTV and motorbike trips in the western United States. I had been thinking about doing one of their adventures for the past two years but the timing never seemed to work out. However, in early August, I decided that it was time to get out and make it happen.

I was fortunate to be able to spend four days over Labor Day weekend traveling from St. George, Utah, through the Northern Arizona desert to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon in my own UTV four-wheeler. I traveled in a caravan of 14 guests, accompanied by four guides, a cook and a photographer.

 

In reflecting upon my adventure, I was able to take away a few key points that can apply to my role as a wealth advisor.

1. Communication is key. Imagine being alone in the desert for seven hours without a way to communicate with your guide. This is what happened to me on that Saturday. How, you ask? For the prior two days, we were using a “flagging” system where, if the lead guide came to a fork in the road, he would pull over and have the next driver stay and direct traffic in the proper direction. Given the speed at which we were driving (oftentimes 60–70 mph), the distance between vehicles (sometimes hundreds of yards due to the dust or other factors) and the length of our entire caravan, it wasn’t uncommon for the total distance from beginning to end to be 5–10 miles long. Additionally, we had a large truck hauling our food, camping supplies and extra gasoline, among other things, that was oftentimes 20–30 minutes behind. The truck was always the “sweeper,” meaning anyone who acted as a flagger was to remain in position until the truck got to you and that was the signal to move out.

We left camp early on Saturday morning, and after a few miles of winding turns in the pine forest, we reached a fork in the road and the guide positioned me as the flagger. Over the course of the next 15–20 minutes, I performed my duty as four-wheelers passed me, pointing them in the direction ahead along the dirt road. Another 10–15 minutes passed and I began to wonder, Where is the truck? Eventually, it became clear to me that they had left me.

Later, I found out our lead guide had instructed another guide to act as a sweeper instead of the truck. The new sweeper waived as he went by, assuming this was enough for me to follow him. I was still thinking about what the lead guide had said on the first day, which was DO NOT LEAVE YOUR POSITION UNTIL THE SWEEPER RELIEVES YOU. When changes occur, it’s critical that all parties know what the change is.

As you know, we work in teams at Morton Capital to ensure the highest level of client service. To this end, each advisory team meets weekly to thoroughly address all client matters. These recurring weekly meetings are supplemented by morning huddles (brief meetings) throughout the week to address the most pertinent issues of the day so we all know when changes occur.

We are also passionate about proactive communication with your other trusted advisors, like your CPA, insurance advisor and estate attorney.

During the pandemic, we enhanced our communications with our clients even further, all with the purpose of staying connected so you knew we were on top of your finances. Our outreach included robust video content and webinars that covered everything from the economy to investor behavior. Additionally, we created articles and content for social media via platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram.

2. Don’t make a bad situation worse. It was about 12:00 or 1:00 pm—the sun was directly overhead and the desert was cooking. I’d been alone for probably two hours and I was getting antsy. I thought to myself, Ok, I can catch up to them. I had a general sense of the direction they were going, and it was just me, so I could go faster than the caravan.I took off down the mountain covered in pine trees, screaming around corners and straightaways for about 10 miles. I hit a T-junction and saw the vast terrain of open desert in front of me. I could see for about 100 miles to my left, 100 miles to my right and 100 miles in front of me—truly like something out of a movie. My caravan was nowhere in sight, so I’d be speculating by picking a direction to try and find them.

Oftentimes, when things don’t go our way, we can feel like we have to “do something.” In this case, I had to evaluate the risks of staying put (playing defense) versus going on the offensive. I decided the smart thing to do was to go back to my original position where I had shade and water and wait it out. I knew the terrain better and it was my best chance of the guide knowing where I was. Also, given that we had experienced four flat tires up until that point and my rig was not outfitted with a spare tire or the necessary tools, it seemed too risky for me to wander off into the desert alone with limited water. In the case of my adventure, access to shade and water were my most basic needs and the most important drivers of my decision.

Markets and investments don’t always go as planned. Our natural inclination might be to sell when asset prices fall. While it might feel good in the moment to “do something,” more often than not, these knee-jerk reactions work against us in the long run.

Focusing on risk management ahead of time and properly evaluating both the upside and downside of a given action or investment is critical. Additionally, focusing on the basics when things get complicated can help. This is why we are so passionate about cash flow in our investments. At the end of the day, we can’t control the price a buyer will give us for an investment but if we focus on the basics of cash flow, that is a universal sign of health and stability in any environment.

3. Always have a backup plan or safety net. At the beginning of our trip, our guide had given us a small black pouch and in it was a device with an SOS button. It was only to be used in extreme emergencies. If you hit the SOS button, it would activate local first responders and they would send in the helicopter to find you. Knowing I had that in my tool chest should I need it gave me the comfort to sit tight.Ultimately, I waited it out and one of the guides returned around 5:00 pm. We raced through the desert for the next few hours as the sun set, trying to cover as much ground as possible before night fell. By around 10:00 pm, we made it to camp just in time for roasted herb chicken with a side of fresh dill potato salad. I sat around the campfire with the guys as they teased me for getting “lost.” It was all in good fun.

As we have added financial planning as a core element of our services. When developing our clients’ cash flow plan, we stress-test the plan for a variety of factors like down markets, long-term healthcare events and lower returns to ensure we have a backup plan in place so you are in the best position possible to adapt to most any circumstance.

Knowing ahead of time that your financial plan can withstand these difficult situations helps to calm the natural anxiety you experience when confronted with a situation beyond your direct control.

How often does someone get to spend the night 50 feet from the edge of the Grand Canyon? Or gaze up at the Milky Way galaxy with no light pollution and see the night sky with an unblemished view? Or watch the sun come up over the North Rim? Life is short. We are a culture of information overload, flooded with constant information on a daily basis about politics, our economy, the civil unrest our nation is currently experiencing, the pandemic, etc. Having four days away from emails, text messages and phone calls was really good for my soul and allowed me to be grateful for the career I have, the clients I serve and the talented people I am blessed to work with on a daily basis, all contributing to our mission of helping our clients get the most life out of their wealth. It also made me eager to get back to Jen and the kids and, yes, to take a shower 🙂

MC Stories – Out of the Mouth of Babes

When I became a mom, I always thought I would be teaching my kids things, not the other way around, especially when it comes to what I do for a living. But as they say—out of the mouth of babes. . . .

One morning recently, I was anxious to take the kids to my parents’ house to go swimming. We’ve been isolating inside like the rest of the world due to the current pandemic, but have been fortunate enough to be able to keep my family in our “bubble.”

My husband and I have three beautiful girls: Dilynn (4), Nora (2), and Harlowe (10 mos). Dilynn is my most tenacious. As we were putting on our shoes to leave, she asked if she could go pack her backpack. Knowing she would put up a fight if I said no, I told her to go pack it quickly.

After a minute or two, Dilynn hadn’t returned. I found her in her room just looking around. Somewhat annoyed, I told her to just grab Puppy (her favorite stuffed animal) and Cozy (her favorite blanket). She pushed back (did I mention her tenacity?) and said she always brings Puppy and Cozy and that she needed to pack other things. She then asked me, “Mom, where are we going? I need to know if I should pack my mittens or a bathing suit.”

That question, out of the mouth of my four-year-old daughter, really made clear just how important it is to know your destination before you pack. Similarly, as advisors, our clients’ life goals—their destination—are so important for us to know before we can create their portfolio allocation. We probably all remember our favorite stuffed animal or special blanket/comfort item, which is, as Dilynn pointed out, an essential item we always pack. Similarly, certain assets like stocks and bonds are essential parts of every portfolio. However, at Morton Capital, we believe that diversification beyond those two asset classes is crucial when trying to mitigate risk and customize our strategy to help clients achieve success. How we choose which additional investments to add to the portfolio is guided by the client’s goals/destination. We need to know if a client needs mittens (maybe that is something that provides more long-term appreciation) or if they need a bathing suit (maybe that is something with less liquidity risk that provides monthly cash flow).

Furthermore, when I first found Dilynn in her room, she wasn’t just stuffing things in her bag. She was looking around. She was taking inventory. To be able to pack for your destination, you have to know what you have first (and what you might be missing). As advisors, we feel this “taking inventory” step, what we call data gathering, is the most important part of the process when it comes to creating a dynamic financial plan that gives our clients control over their long-term financial decisions. Thus, we spend a significant amount of time on data gathering, asking for a breakdown of expenses (such as how much you spend on dining out vs. groceries), mortgage statements, bank statements, insurance policies, and tax returns. Many of our clients assume that providing us with broad income and expense numbers will give us sufficient information to produce an accurate plan, or one that is “close enough.” However, this could mean that you might end up packing a bathing suit when what you really need is a pair of mittens, or, worse, packing half a bathing suit and one mitten (i.e., close but not enough).

It is easy to get stuck in the rhythm of our day-to-day routine. I talk to clients all the time about what we do and why we do it. However, this particular morning with Dilynn really made our process and the reasons behind it more tangible for me. I can’t wait to see what she teaches me next.

How Business Owners Can Find Opportunity in Chaos

While 2020 may seem like a difficult time to be a business owner, there are hidden opportunities to grow in the chaos, especially if you think of opportunity as the ability to make positive changes in your business regardless of what’s going on around you. Below are five things that every business owner should consider in this environment to capitalize on potential opportunities for growth.

Click here to read the full article.

Author:
Wade Calvert, Morton Capital, Wealth Advisor & Partner

Leadership in a New Workplace

As businesses prepare for a return to work in the coming month, one of the most important questions that every leader must be ready to address is: How do we operate differently to ensure that our people are still engaged and motivated? Beyond questions surrounding how to resume regular operations, we must first consider how we’ll successfully lead our teams through the drastic changes in their work environment.

Click here to read the full article.

Author:
Dan Charoenrath, Morton Capital, Direct of Operations

Whitepaper – The New RIA Workplace

Our industry, our country, and the entire world was turned on its head in March as local and federal governments began to institute widespread stay-at-home orders. While some RIAs were caught flat-footed from a technology perspective, the RIA industry has been luckier than many brick-and-mortar establishments that needed to completely shut their doors during this unprecedented time. With most custodial systems, financial planning tools, CRMs, performance reporting technology, and data file servers now in the cloud, many RIAs did not miss a beat when employees fired up their internet-connected computers from home and logged into their typical applications.

Working from home has undoubtedly required our teams to work harder, but at a high level it has been fairly close to “business as usual.” Clients are still being serviced: accounts are still being opened, wires are still being sent, model portfolios are still being implemented and rebalanced. Even those RIA owners who have historically been the staunchest opponents of remote work have had to admit that this forced experiment has gone better than anyone could have imagined. And as the stay-at-home orders have continued from weeks to months, many are questioning if the traditional workday will ever look the same. Much has been written and discussed about the technology advancements not just in our industry but in society at large, but for the first time, we are now examining the physical space we work in and what the physical office of the future will look like.

Click here to reach the full article.

Authors:
Stacey McKinnon, Morton Capital, COO
Matt Sonnen, PFI Advisors, CEO

Featuring:
Michael Kossman, Aspiriant, COO
Brandon McKerney, Columbia Pacific Wealth Management, Director of Operations

 

Staying Connected During COVID-19 – Final Webinar

Our final COVID-19 webinar was moderated by our COO, Stacey McKinnon, who asked the following questions of Wealth Advisors Bruce Tyson and Jason Naiman related to the impact of government policy on investor portfolios: 

  • We have seen a massive amount of money printing over the last decade – how has that impacted stocks and bonds?
  • How might the pandemic impact the election?
  • How should business owners think differently coming out of the lockdown?

To register for access to these online events and/or submit any questions you would like our Wealth Advisors to answer for you please email us at questions@mortoncapital.com

https://vimeo.com/mortoncapital/stayingconnectedwebinar05052020

We look forward to you joining us on future webinars!

Staying Connected During COVID-19 – Webinar #5

Led by our Wealth Advisors Alan Kane and Chelsea Watson, this webinar addressed client questions surrounding the latest developments of COVID-19 and its impact on the market. Alan Kane has more than 39 years of experience in financial services. He shared his views on the past major cycles and what we can learn from history in the current environment. Chelsea Watson has been with Morton Capital for over 10 years. She shared her perspective on how we may need to change plans and adapt to life after the pandemic.

To register for access to these online events and/or submit any questions you would like our Wealth Advisors to answer for you please email us at questions@mortoncapital.com

https://vimeo.com/mortoncapital/stayingconnectedwebinar04282020

We look forward to you joining us on future webinars!

Staying Connected During COVID-19 – Webinar #4

Senior Vice President and Wealth Advisor, Joe Seetoo, and Wealth Advisor, Priscilla Brehm, this webinar addressed the following client questions surrounding the latest developments of COVID-19 and its impact on the market:

  • Why is the Federal Reserve buying bonds as part of the newest stimulus package? Emotions often drive decision-making.
  • What behavioral biases should I look out for when making financial decisions?
  • I’ve been told to invest for the long term. What does that mean?
  • What does that mean? How should I invest differently for the short term vs. the long term?

To register for access to these online events and/or submit any questions you would like our Wealth Advisors to answer for you please email us at questions@mortoncapital.com

https://vimeo.com/mortoncapital/stayingconnectedwebinar04142020

We look forward to you joining us on future webinars!