Posts

Mid-Quarter Newsletter – June 2021

 

Hear Our Story Video

We’ve been busy capturing some exciting video content these last few months as we prepare to launch a new look on our website. As a firm, we wanted to create a video to give our clients and our community the opportunity to learn more about us: how we began, why we believe in investing in alternatives, how we define our mission of “empowering better investors,” what we think sets us apart as a company, and what our vision is for the future of Morton Capital.

We hope you enjoy this behind-the-scenes look into our company. Click below to meet our leadership team and hear our story.

Watch the video here.

 

Why Is Everyone Talking About Inflation?

Inflation has been a hot topic over the last couple of months. Core consumer prices, which are how much you pay for typical goods and services (excluding much more variable food and energy prices), rose 0.9% last month, the biggest monthly gain since April 1982. The combination of higher labor and material costs is leading to a larger pickup in inflation at a time when governmental policies are supporting faster economic growth. The Federal Reserve has told investors that it will continue to support the economy, with the goal of achieving full employment, so it’s willing to let inflation run “hotter” than before. The question is whether or not these factors will lead to a short-term but temporary bump in inflation or a sustained and problematic increase.

There are several global trends that are helping make the case for higher sustained inflation going forward. For years, globalization had been a force keeping inflationary pressures in check, as manufacturing and consumer goods production moved to emerging economies with cheaper labor. This trend appears to be reversing and many countries, including the U.S., are looking to bring manufacturing jobs back home. Another important global trend supporting inflation is the push toward decarbonization to offset the damage and danger of climate change. Demand for renewable sources of energy will continue to push up prices on base materials like silver, copper, nickel and lithium, as these are essential components to implementing these technologies. A third, and perhaps more important, factor has been the explosion in global debt following the COVID-19 pandemic. The ratio of global debt to gross domestic product (the total value of goods and services in an entire year!) rose to 356% in 2020, up 35% from 2019. For perspective, this ratio only rose 10% in 2008 following the Global Financial Crisis. Given this huge amount of debt, policies have to support higher inflation so that debt burdens can be paid back in future years with cheaper dollars.

As fiduciaries, we must be aware of the risk of higher inflation and its resulting erosion of purchasing power in our clients’ portfolios. We’ve been concerned about increasing inflation for many years now, and have consequently built certain positions into the portfolio that we believe can act as hedges against the depreciation of fiat currencies, which don’t have intrinsic value on their own. For example, our positions in gold and mining companies, as well as our focus on real assets (real estate equity and lending strategies backed by real assets), we believe will remain resilient and maintain their true value in an inflationary environment. In the face of rising inflation pressures and expectations, we’ll continue to monitor the overall landscape and incorporate additional real assets and inflation hedges as we see fit

 

DISCLOSURES
Information presented herein is for educational purposes only. It should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any security or asset class, and should not be considered investment advice. Certain investment opportunities discussed herein may only be available to eligible clients and are presented for illustrative purposes only. Past performance is not indicative of future results. All investments involve risk including the loss of principal.

 

What to Expect from an In-Depth Financial Plan

 Here at Morton, creating a financial plan is one of the key steps to our clients getting the most life out of their wealth. But what does creating a financial plan look like for you, our clients? Contrary to what you might think, a financial plan is not something that your advisory team does for you; it’s something that you and your advisory team do together.

Your advisory team will work behind the scenes with Morton’s financial planning team to craft your plan, but it’s only with your participation in the process that we can create a plan that will serve as a road map for your financial success. There are a lot of strategies in financial planning that can help solve issues, but the more information you give us about your financial life, the better we can determine which of those planning strategies are right for you. After all, if you buy a sweater in the wrong size—no matter how beautiful—you won’t be able to wear it. If, however, you spend the time upfront taking your measurements, you’ll end up with a sweater that actually fits you. In financial planning, just like in life, one size does not fit all.
That’s why, over the course of the next several weeks, we’ll be publishing a series of posts on the various components of an in-depth financial plan: cash flow, retirement, insurance, investments, tax, and estate. Our goal is to educate you on what to expect in the financial planning process so that you can fully partner with us: what topics we’ll bring up, what documents we’ll ask for, and why all of this is important to create a full picture of your financial situation.

We believe that committing to doing a financial plan is committing to investing in yourself. The success of your plan is directly impacted by how much time and effort you want to invest in the process. If you make the commitment, we can help empower you to make informed decisions so that you’re in control of your wealth and success, whatever that means for you. Might that be a lofty goal? Yes. Is it worth it so that you can sleep at night and achieve what you want in life? Absolutely. You may still be able to make an ill-fitting sweater work, but don’t you deserve a sweater that fits you just right? Here at Morton, we think so too.

 

DISCLOSURES
Presented for informational purposes only. You should seek financial, tax and legal advice from your professional advisors before implementing any transactions and/or strategies concerning your financial plan.

 

New Podcast: The Ripcord Moment

Our Senior Vice President and Wealth Advisor, Joe Seetoo, recently kicked off his passion project called The Ripcord Moment, a podcast dedicated to empowering business owners through the exit planning process. Each episode of the podcast focuses on the experiences of business owners and their team of advisors who have made the jump and successfully handed off their business to the next generation, existing partners or strategic buyers.

Subscribe to the podcast and listen to the latest episodes of The Ripcord Moment by clicking below.

Also available to listen on Apple and Spotify
Listen to The Ripcord Moment Podcast here

 

Welcome, Brian and Sherry

Brian Mann
Wealth Advisor

What does wealth mean to you?
“Get the most life out of your wealth” have been words to live and work by at Morton Capital for years. Notice how the word “life” comes before the word “wealth”? That’s intentional. I don’t think my definition of wealth has changed over the years—it’s still very much associated with accumulating money. What has changed, however, is that my wife and children have completely transformed and refocused my purpose behind actually building wealth. Now, wealth to me feels much more like a means to an end, the “end” being a life spent using the money I earn on the people and experiences that produce lasting and meaningful memories. I want to continue to go on dates with my wife. I want my children to experience the world. And I want the time and freedom to enjoy the little things along the way. THAT’s my wealthy life.

What inspires you about the work you do at MC?
I’m inspired by the prospect of doing well by doing good and by helping clients uncover what values guide their lives (and investing accordingly). I started my career working at Human Rights First in Washington, D.C., advocating for and defending the rights of immigrants and refugees, so doing good is incredibly important to me. On a daily basis, I have the privilege of speaking with my clients about sustainable and values-based investing, and I’m able to design financial plans and portfolios that allow them to speak with their dollars. At Morton Capital, we’ve been deeply involved in our local communities and charities and offering investments in socially conscious funds for years. True to our mission and investment philosophy, I’m proud that we consistently seek knowledge and resources that allow our clients to pursue these investments at our firm.

What’s a fun fact that most people may not know about you?
I learned to scuba dive in the Philippines but am still terrified of any large marine animals.

 

Sherry Uchuion
Compliance Administrator

What does wealth mean to you?
Wealth is often defined in terms of possessions and the abundance of quantifiable things, but what if we were to consider the unmeasurable aspects of our lives the most precious? To me, wealth has always been about those moments in between: the slow mornings with your family making breakfast, taking the day to be outside with your friends, or having the ability to be present for your partner in times of celebration and times of despair. I have always defined my wealth by how I spend my time, because unlike any other currency, time is one that cannot simply be replaced.

What inspires you about the work you do at MC?
I’m inspired daily by the entire team at MC. The best part of what I do here is providing support so that my coworkers feel confident that they’re delivering the best possible service to our clients.

What’s a fun fact that most people may not know about you?
I was a piano teacher for almost 10 years and I taught students from the age of three years old all the way up to adulthood.

MC Stories – Save Your Portfolio . . . and the World

Climate change hasn’t always been terribly high on my list of concerns. Don’t get me wrong, I believed the science, but it had been a selfish, somewhat conscious choice to ignore dealing with something I was pretty sure wouldn’t greatly affect me. I’ve lived in Santa Monica, where the beach is vast, and in Pasadena, where the sun shines hot, and I could never envision a time where either would become undesirable, let alone unlivable.

My wife, Alyssa, began her career preparing for and responding to natural disasters, first in California, then in a similar role with the U.S. government at FEMA, which moved us to Washington, D.C. She dealt with fires in the West, hurricanes in the Northeast, and tornados in the Midwest. She even traveled to Japan to understand the impact of their disastrous tsunami in March 2011. Throughout her 15 years working on climate and conservation issues, she’s spent innumerous hours educating governments and businesses alike on the perils of increasing temperatures and global sea-level rise.

While I once may have felt captive to these data-dense presentation rehearsals, I came to first merely absorb, but later to seek, the alarming data she was gathering. It was then that I began to make the inevitable connections between her professional world and mine. I thought, “I’m likely investing in companies that do the same damage my wife is devoting her career to remedying. Could I invest and make money in companies that were doing less harm? Or even some good? Environment can’t be the only social issue affected by investing. Could I make even a small impact by limiting exposure to companies that profit in guns, tobacco, child labor, etc.?”

I’ve devoted an increasing amount of free time over recent years to the pursuit of educating myself in the nuances of socially conscious investing and marrying my values to my own personal investment choices. At Morton Capital, we’ve been deeply involved in our local communities and charities and offering investments in socially conscious funds for years. True to our mission and investment philosophy, I’m proud that we consistently seek knowledge and resources that allow our clients to pursue these investments at our firm.

When I introduce my clients to the concept of investing with their heads AND their hearts, I begin, as below, by exploring some of the broader definitions and themes. I also ensure that I address some common misconceptions associated with socially conscious investing. I most commonly see that people think that socially conscious investing means having to sacrifice returns, or that they are more expensive and harder to access. And while not all investments will be available or appropriate for every investor, I find it helpful to address multiple disciplines within the socially conscious investing realm to help provide more insight into the wide variety of strategies that exist. Below are three commonly implemented ones, listed from broader value-focused strategies to those purely focused on impact.

ESG (Environmental, Social, Governance):
This common strategy evaluates companies based on how well they are managing the various environmental, social, and corporate governance issues they face in their businesses. A top-down ESG investment strategy invests in companies that rate highly in environmental, social, and governance factors while still maintaining a focus on the returns and associated risks.

SRI (Socially Responsible Investing):
Socially responsible investing goes one step further than ESG by actively eliminating or selecting investments according to specific ethical guidelines. The underlying motive could be religion, personal values, or political beliefs. Unlike ESG analysis, which shapes valuations, SRI uses ESG factors to apply negative or positive screens to the broader investment universe.

Impact/Thematic Investing
In impact or thematic investing, positive outcomes are of the utmost importance—meaning the investments need to have a positive social or environmental impact in some way. The objective of impact investing is to help a business or organization accomplish specific goals that are beneficial to society or the environment. One example might be investing in a nonprofit dedicated to the research and development of clean energy, regardless of whether success is guaranteed.

As I mentioned, there are many more strategies associated with socially conscious investing than I’ve listed above, evidence of how seriously the investment world is paying attention to not only climate change but social impact as well. Investing with your head AND your heart can and will shape the future of investing as we know it. Knowing how to invest is only the beginning

 

DISCLOSURES:

This summary is for informational purposes only. It should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any individual security or asset class. This document expresses the views of the author and such views are subject to change without notice. Morton Capital makes no representation that the strategies described are suitable or appropriate for any person.

All investments involve the risk of loss, including the loss of principal. Past performance is not indicative of future returns. A Fund’s concentration in a certain sector and lack of diversification across other sectors present risks specific to its strategy and should be carefully considered. You should consult with your financial advisor to thoroughly review all information and consider all ramifications before implementing any transactions and/or strategies concerning your finances.

Introducing Brian Mann, Wealth Advisor

What moments in your career have given you the most satisfaction and fulfillment?

In 2009, at the Otay Mesa Detention Center thirty minutes east of San Diego, and just a mile and a half from the U.S.–Mexico border, I met my 20-year-old client for the first time. I had recently finished law school and was working for a nonprofit representing asylum seekers, most of whom were from Eastern Africa. He arrived in the U.S. seeking asylum from Somalia, his entire family victims of ethnic cleansing outside Mogadishu. He was shot in the stomach, slashed across the face, and left for dead the day he decided to flee. He was one of the lucky ones. The virtually nonexistent medical care at the detention center left him dying from infection, our translator, Omar, and I his only advocates. After somehow surviving his trip halfway around the world with a bullet in his abdomen, he miraculously survived. Those two enormous hurdles cleared, it was now my responsibility to prove in a U.S. immigration court that he would be killed if he were forcibly returned to Somalia.

Eight years later, I was in another hospital room, this time at Methodist Hospital in Arcadia, CA, and under very different circumstances. My client, 61, had recently suffered a massive stroke, leaving him capable of little more than eye movements and the slightest facial expressions. In this state, he was soon to inevitably leave behind an adorably loving and utterly terrified wife and two young adult sons. I began working intently with the couple about two years prior as their financial advisor. Their goal was to simplify their chaotic estate and finances so they could return their full attention to their local Los Angeles medical practice and Doctors Without Borders work in South America. I don’t think it’s a stretch to say the three of us spent 15 hours together those first two years. We’d become close, and I was the only non-family member allowed in the hospital during this time.

I have walked two very different paths in my career, but both have intimately shown me elation and despair. At the time, I questioned if I should have even been in the hospital rooms alongside my clients. These moments were filled with pain and worry, and I felt helpless in them. But sometimes it’s in the hardest moments where we find purpose and fulfillment.

My client from Somalia was granted asylum. Eleven years later, he regularly writes and sends me pictures of his wife and children, braving still unfamiliar Minnesota winters and taking every opportunity to remind me of our connection and his gratitude. Even after my client passed away at Methodist, his wife continued her frequent trips to the office. After months and months of work, their financial matters were finally buttoned up shortly before he fell ill, so her visits were not to conduct any business. She calls and visits just to share about her charity work and family and to hear stories of my own young kids. “My husband knew I was going to be okay, and that’s because of you,” she still says to me.

When I reflect on what’s fulfilling and what’s satisfying about the work I’ve done, I think about each of them.