Mid Quarter Newsletter – December 2019

No Profits? No Problem!

In the venture capital industry, a “unicorn” refers to a technology startup company that has reached a private valuation of $1 billion. While few and far between in the past, these types of companies are commonplace in today’s market, and, more surprisingly still, most are actually losing money.  Uber, Lyft and Peloton are a few high-profile examples of recent initial public offerings (IPOs) that are not profitable. Of late, the public markets have not been kind to these investments, as they are all trading well below their peak prices (see table below).

The most outrageous example has been the debacle associated with the collapse of the IPO plans for WeWork. A few short months ago, the office rental company was expected to offer shares to the public at a total business valuation of $47 billion. However, in the third quarter, WeWork reported a net loss of $1.25 billion despite having revenue for that same quarter of $934 million! When investors balked at these sky-high valuations, the company was forced to withdraw its IPO, which also led to the downfall of its charismatic founder, Adam Neumann.

Given the run-up in technology stocks in the past several years, it’s obvious that many startups are positioning themselves as tech companies to command these excessive valuations. Most of these companies, however, are not true technology companies. They all use technology to run their businesses, but WeWork is basically a real estate leasing company. Founders, early investors and investment banks have bought into these “story stocks,” resulting in excessively high pricing for these IPOs. Perhaps rationality is coming back to the market as evidenced by the recent poor stock performance of some of these name brands, along with the withdrawal or deferral of other planned IPOs such as with Airbnb. When markets eventually calm down, we’ll inevitably return to a time when profits actually matter more than stories.

How Will Impeachment Affect the Markets?

As we send out this article, it seems highly probable that President Trump will become the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. However, it’s important to note that impeachment does not necessarily mean removal from office. Our seventeenth president, Andrew Johnson, and our forty-second, Bill Clinton, the two previous presidents to be impeached, were not removed from office (Johnson narrowly avoided conviction in the Senate by 1 vote!). As an aside, Richard Nixon actually resigned from office before being formally impeached.

So how is impeachment different from removing a U.S. president from office? Impeachment in the U.S. is the process by which the House of Representatives files charges against a government official, and in any ensuing trial, the Senate would determine whether to convict and remove that official from office. While only a simple majority vote is required by the House of Representatives to initiate impeachment, a two-thirds vote is required in the Senate to convict the president. Based on party lines, the House is likely to vote for impeachment. However, assuming all Democrats in the Senate voted in favor of conviction, 20 Republicans would still have to cross party lines and vote for a conviction for the president to be removed from office.

How this relates to the market

Given the relatively limited information, it’s hard to draw a strong conclusion about how impeachment will impact the markets. The market was up decently during Clinton’s impeachment and down a fair amount around Nixon’s impeachment hearings. However, the economic forces at the time may have had a much larger impact than the impeachment proceedings themselves. More specifically, the Clinton impeachment happened during the tech boom of the late ’90s while Nixon’s hearings paralleled the OPEC oil embargo and runaway inflation of the early ’70s.

Assuming everything follows party lines, it’s likely that President Trump will be impeached but not convicted and removed from office. Since the probability of this outcome is really high, the market has essentially already priced it in at this stage, meaning this outcome will likely be a nonevent for stocks. On the other hand, if there were to be a surprise conviction in the Senate, then we would expect heightened volatility.

Welcome Austin and Milan

Austin Overholt
Private Investments Administrator

Austin Overholt joined the Private Investments Team at Morton Capital in May 2019, and is integral to the team’s alternative investment coordination and information management. He is a Marine Corps Veteran and, prior to transitioning into the financial services industry, was the Associate Director of the OC Learning Center in Westlake Village. Austin earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in communications with an emphasis in business from California State University, Channel Islands, and his master’s from Pepperdine University. Austin lives in Camarillo with his wife, Megan, and their two children and enjoys being outdoors, off-roading, and barbecuing.

Milan Pfeisinger
Research Analyst

Milan Pfeisinger joined Morton Capital in June 2019. He is a research analyst and works closely with the investment team. Milan previously worked as a cost analyst at Warner Bros. Entertainment. He is originally from Austria and moved to the United States to attend college. He graduated from California State University, Northridge, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics and a minor in finance. Milan recently passed the Level II exam of the CFA® program. Besides work, he enjoys taking long strolls with his pug, Zorro.

Financial Bites Lunch Series

Our Financial Bites lunch series has been a great success! If you haven’t joined us for any of the previous sessions, we encourage you to attend any of the remaining lunches in the new year.

Our next session, on life insurance and long-term care, on Friday, January 24, touches on the “when and when not to” rules on buying life and long-term care insurance policies.

You can RSVP to any of these events by visiting mortoncapital.com/financialbites.

This past September, Wealth Advisors Joseph Seetoo and Celia Meagher presented on budgeting.

Watch the video below and learn everything from what savings/spending strategies you should use to the importance of maintaining a good credit score.

The Six Way Investors Differ

Carl Richards, a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, author and New York Times columnist, wrote an article comparing the good and the bad behavioral differences of investors. To read the article in full, please click on the below link.

Read Article >

Welcome to the World, Baby Harlowe!

We’re thrilled to announce the newest baby to join the MC family. Associate Wealth Advisor Sarah Ellis and her husband, Justin, welcomed their third baby girl, Harlowe Liv, on November 7. Congratulations to their beautiful family!

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