MC Stories – The Technology Age — The Good, the Bad, and a Little Gen Z

Do you remember the time before cell phones, computers, or even televisions?

The generation who might answer “no” to this question, Generation Z, categorized as those born between the years of 1997 and 2015, is also known as the “Smartphone Generation.” According to a 2018 Pew Research Center survey, 95% of 13- to 17-year-olds have access to a smartphone, and a similar share (97%) use at least one of seven major online platforms.1 Teens surveyed have different opinions on whether social media has had a positive or negative effect on their generation. On a macroscale we are learning quickly to deal with the good and bad that is coming from this new Technology Age.

The Good

Staying connected to family and friends is easier than ever. One major cause for the positive impact is that the technologies traditionally used for business purposes, like videoconferencing and screen sharing, are now being brought into the home for personal use. For example, family meetings over Zoom are the new Sunday dinner meetup and grandparents or parents of Generation Z now celebrate birthday parties, baby showers, and graduations virtually. While in-person is preferred, most are happy they can enjoy each other and still maintain safety guidelines during the current pandemic.

Generation Z can also weigh in on the political conversations happening in this crucial election year on platforms such as Twitter and TikTok, even if they are not old enough to vote. Empowering youth to take an active role in their future is the result of independence and resources not afforded to previous generations. Activism is not unique to Gen Z, but this younger generation is sharing opinions of each other at a rapid pace that is affecting their self-worth.

The Bad

The more time teens spend looking at screens, the more likely they are to report symptoms of depression.2 The current circumstances of 2020 may lead you to believe that there is nothing occurring to feel left out of—but not so fast: FOMO, or fear of missing out, still runs rampant due to platforms like Facebook and Instagram, which show us a skewed view of the world and other people’s lives. Young adults who are looking for ways to monetize themselves and make cash fast are using technology to invest more easily which could have a good return or very bad returns depending on the market environment.

New online trading platforms such as Robinhood reported an increase in new accounts, spurred mostly by new investors who saw the market downturn in March of 2020 as an opportunity to start investing. Traditionally, financial professionals who trade stocks are required to pass an exam to obtain their securities license and are regularly monitored according to industry regulations. Millennials and Generation Z, while not as experienced in the investing space, still felt confident buying familiar big name tech stocks.3 If investors employ a buy-and-hold strategy, they may come out successful; but if individuals are allocating mortgage payments or student loan debt to a risky portfolio, they are in for a roller-coaster ride—emotionally and financially.

Generation Z

The Smartphone Generation may be young but they are mighty. They are coming of age during a volatile economy and an unprecedented technology age. The percentage of teens that reported they are online “almost constantly” virtually doubled in 2018 from a couple of years prior. This data makes them prime targets for online advertising and social media campaigns. With the access and speed currently available to this generation, the need to be a prudent investor is even more important. For the parents and other adults affected by this plugged-in generation (i.e., All of Us), it would be advantageous to learn the habits of this new generation and listen to their viewpoints, which are just as bold as past generations but reach much further. Making a wave is much easier with a touch of your smartphone and we are all now finding ourselves in the splash zone.

 

 

1 https://www.pewresearch.org/internet/2018/05/31/teens-social-media-technology-2018/

2 https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/essay/on-the-cusp-of-adulthood-and-facing-an-uncertain-future-what-we-know-about-gen-z-so-far/

3 https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/12/young-investors-pile-into-stocks-seeing-generational-buying-moment-instead-of-risk.html

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