Introducing Brian Mann, Wealth Advisor

What moments in your career have given you the most satisfaction and fulfillment?

In 2009, at the Otay Mesa Detention Center thirty minutes east of San Diego, and just a mile and a half from the U.S.–Mexico border, I met my 20-year-old client for the first time. I had recently finished law school and was working for a nonprofit representing asylum seekers, most of whom were from Eastern Africa. He arrived in the U.S. seeking asylum from Somalia, his entire family victims of ethnic cleansing outside Mogadishu. He was shot in the stomach, slashed across the face, and left for dead the day he decided to flee. He was one of the lucky ones. The virtually nonexistent medical care at the detention center left him dying from infection, our translator, Omar, and I his only advocates. After somehow surviving his trip halfway around the world with a bullet in his abdomen, he miraculously survived. Those two enormous hurdles cleared, it was now my responsibility to prove in a U.S. immigration court that he would be killed if he were forcibly returned to Somalia.

Eight years later, I was in another hospital room, this time at Methodist Hospital in Arcadia, CA, and under very different circumstances. My client, 61, had recently suffered a massive stroke, leaving him capable of little more than eye movements and the slightest facial expressions. In this state, he was soon to inevitably leave behind an adorably loving and utterly terrified wife and two young adult sons. I began working intently with the couple about two years prior as their financial advisor. Their goal was to simplify their chaotic estate and finances so they could return their full attention to their local Los Angeles medical practice and Doctors Without Borders work in South America. I don’t think it’s a stretch to say the three of us spent 15 hours together those first two years. We’d become close, and I was the only non-family member allowed in the hospital during this time.

I have walked two very different paths in my career, but both have intimately shown me elation and despair. At the time, I questioned if I should have even been in the hospital rooms alongside my clients. These moments were filled with pain and worry, and I felt helpless in them. But sometimes it’s in the hardest moments where we find purpose and fulfillment.

My client from Somalia was granted asylum. Eleven years later, he regularly writes and sends me pictures of his wife and children, braving still unfamiliar Minnesota winters and taking every opportunity to remind me of our connection and his gratitude. Even after my client passed away at Methodist, his wife continued her frequent trips to the office. After months and months of work, their financial matters were finally buttoned up shortly before he fell ill, so her visits were not to conduct any business. She calls and visits just to share about her charity work and family and to hear stories of my own young kids. “My husband knew I was going to be okay, and that’s because of you,” she still says to me.

When I reflect on what’s fulfilling and what’s satisfying about the work I’ve done, I think about each of them.

Why Is Gold Going Up?

Gold is making headlines in 2020, as its performance leads most other asset classes year-to-date and investors are starting to take notice. In particular, Warren Buffet’s recent purchase of a gold mining stock has caught the attention of the media. Those who only think of gold as a “safe-haven” investment have been surprised by its strong performance even as the stock market rallied from its March low. But fundamentally, we believe that gold is not an investment at all. Instead, it’s just another form of money like the U.S. dollar or the Euro. So, if it’s not an investment, what’s driving this big rally in gold? While the answer can be complex, we’d argue that there are two main areas on which to focus when it comes to understanding the price of gold: the money supply and investor sentiment.

Read the full article by clicking the image below.

 

Senior Vice President Joe Seetoo, awarded the Wealth Management – Trail Blazer Award by the San Fernando Valley Business Journal

Congratulations to Senior Vice President Joe Seetoo, who was recently awarded the Wealth Management – Trail Blazer Award by the San Fernando Valley Business Journal. Joe’s reputation of excellence, integrity and going above-and-beyond for our clients are just a few of the many reasons why he is considered a trusted advisor by many at Morton Capital. Congratulations Joe!

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Disclosures:

San Fernando Valley Business Journal (“SFVBJ”) Trusted Advisors is an independent listing produced annually by the SFVBJ. The award is based on data provided by individual advisors and their firms. Only advisors who submitted information are included for consideration, and investment returns are not a component of the rankings. The award is based upon a recipient’s application and not upon any qualitative and quantitative criteria relating specifically to one’s position as an investment advisor. As such, the award is not representative of any one client’s experience. This award does not evaluate the quality of services provided to clients and is not indicative of the investment advisor’s future performance. Neither the RIA firms nor their employees pay a fee to the SFVBJ in exchange for inclusion in the Trusted Advisors awards.

Morton Capital Management has been included on the Barron’s Top 100 Independent Financial Advisors rankings from 2007-2008 and 2010-2016. Morton Capital was not included in the Barron’s rankings in 2009 and 2017. Barron’s ranking is not representative of any one client’s experience and is not indicative of Morton Capital’s future performance, nor does it predict any potential investment outcomes. Morton Capital does not pay a fee to Barron’s in exchange for the rating.

 

Vice President, Joe Seetoo, Interviewed in About Money – Should You Own Alternative Investments in Retirement?

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By Dana Anspach, Money Over 55 Expert
Updated March 16, 2016.

Alternative investments can offer higher yields to retirees, but they aren’t for everyone. To present both the pros and cons I reached out to Joe Seetoo, Vice President, Morton Capital Management.

Morton Capital, a registered investment advisor in California, specializes in bringing hand-picked alternative investments to their high net worth clients. They receive no compensation from the underlying investments which puts them in the perfect position to offer an objective opinion and do the research and due diligence that needs to be done before venturing into the alternative asset class world.

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