Mid Quarter Newsletter – September 2019

Interest Rate Movements – How to Make Sense of Them?

At its July meeting, the U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed) lowered interest rates for the first time since December 2008. Officially, the Fed’s reasoning was that it was worried about inflation not hitting the desired 2% goal. But unofficially? They may have instead caved to market forces, political pressures and global trade tensions. Since then, interest rates on U.S. government bonds have fallen across the board, with the 30-year U.S. Treasury falling below 2% for the first time ever.

With all the talk of interest rates in the news, it can be easy to lose sight of what they actually are: simply the cost of borrowing money. In normal environments, interest rates are decided by the supply and demand for money. However, the Fed also has a hand in things—it sets the short-term rates at which banks can borrow either from each other or the Fed. When those interest rates rise, the rates that banks charge their customers for a loan (for providing a mortgage or starting a business, for instance) typically go up too. In theory, the rates that banks can pay their deposit customers should also rise, though miraculously that upward adjustment can sometimes lag pretty meaningfully behind any actual rate increases.  

Below, we take a more detailed look at how rising or falling interest rates generally affect us all, from consumers to corporations to the economy. 

So how do lower interest rates affect investors’ portfolios and financial goals? Many savers are being punished with the lower income that results from the Fed’s move to lower rates. Since yields on most bonds are so low in the current environment, otherwise conservative investors often have to move into riskier asset classes (like stocks) to try to maintain their income levels as interest rates decline. Rather than play that game, Morton Capital has elected to seek out strategies that are somewhat agnostic to moves in interest rates. Even though the future return prospects for traditional bonds just got a bit bleaker, we are fortunate to have other tools at our disposal to earn investors what we feel is attractive income without undue risk. 

Wealth and Legacy Planning – New MC Service

When Lon Morton first founded the company, he was driven by the desire to help people. In our business, helping others can take many forms, and over the years, many of you have experienced our broadened array of services to help meet this vision. This includes collaborating with you to define what it looks like to enjoy your wealth, sourcing investment opportunities to protect your wealth, and designing financial plans to organize your wealth. To further enhance our capabilities, we’ve added Brian Standing to the team, who has 12 years of experience as a wealth and legacy planner. His role is to have estate planning discussions with our clients as an additional component of our financial planning service. 

We recognize that estate planning can be emotionally daunting and time-consuming, and that it’s often difficult to ensure all the pieces of your financial life are organized in the way you want. In many cases, we’ve been a part of our clients’ lives for decades and personally understand family dynamics (such as the best way to have conversations with your children about wealth), values and intentions. This is why our advisors are now partnering with Brian to align your financial plan with your estate plan and ensure your wealth is transitioned according to your wishes.

We’re excited about this new offering and hope that you, our clients, will be too. At Morton Capital, we have a goal of empowering our clients to enjoy their wealth by organizing and simplifying their financial life. We believe this new offering should do just that. Please reach out to your advisory team if you would like to schedule a wealth and legacy consultation.

Welcome Brian and Adam

Brian Standing, Esq.
Wealth Planner

Brian Standing joined Morton Capital as a Wealth Planner in June 2019. From 2007 to 2019, Brian worked in private law practice in the area of estate planning and taxation. He received his JD from Southwestern Law School and earned his undergraduate degree from Loyola Marymount University. Brian is certified as a specialist in estate planning, trust and probate law by the State Bar of California’s Board of Legal Specialization. Outside of work, Brian enjoys spending time with his wife and three kids.

Adam Bartkoski
Finance and HR Manager

Adam joined Morton Capital in April 2019 as the Finance and HR Manager. He has almost 20 years of experience in financial services, including roles at Fidelity Investments and Fiduciary Network. Adam also spent two years as a volunteer with the Peace Corps, serving as a teacher for a school in Kharkiv, Ukraine. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Texas A&M University.

Financial Bites Lunch Series

A few weeks ago, we kicked off our Financial Bites lunch series. This complimentary series covers the basics on a number of financial planning topics, such as investments, estate planning and long-term care. If you weren’t able to join us for our Retirement Planning session, we encourage you to attend one of the other six sessions over the next several months. 

Our next lunch, on budgeting, on Friday, September 20, focuses on the importance of checking your financial pulse – everything from what savings/spending strategies you should use to the importance of maintaining a good credit score. 

You can RSVP to any of these events by visiting mortoncapital.com/financialbites.

 

GET THE MOST LIFE OUT OF YOUR WEALTH (SM)

Quarterly Commentary – Q2 2019

One for the Record Books

The current U.S. economic expansion is now officially the longest in history, having just entered its 121st month. Shortly after the end of the second quarter, stock markets also hit all-time record highs. These milestones are juxtaposed against another less thrilling record: the current economic expansion has also been the weakest recovery since World War II.

While it is impossible to know how long the current expansion will last, economic data is flashing warning signs. Growth was already on course to slow this year as the fiscal stimulus boost associated with last year’s tax cuts has faded. The bigger drag, however, is stemming from the U.S. administration’s erratic trade policies, which has introduced further uncertainty in business investments.

History of U.S. Economic Expansions

Source:  National Bureau of Economic Research & Bloomberg

Synchronized Asset Class Appreciation

All asset classes, both risky and more conservative, surprisingly, have rallied strongly in the first half of the year.  This rally has occurred against a backdrop where global economic growth has slowed, trade tensions have persisted, large tech companies have faced regulatory scrutiny, and financial market distortions have deepened.  As we pointed out in our first-quarter client commentary, the most obvious explanation for the appreciation of asset classes across-the-board has to do with central banks’ renewed willingness to cut interest rates, thus raising virtually all asset class valuations.

The first half of the year saw a historic policy U-turn from a well-advertised “policy normalization” to a significantly more dovish stance by the U.S. Federal Reserve, which has also been adopted by the other three major central banks (European Central Bank, Bank of Japan and People’s Bank of China).  While history will tell the tale of the record-breaking U.S. economy and stock markets, it may fail to show how reliant financial markets have become on extraordinary accommodative monetary policies (i.e., zero or negative interest rates and multiple rounds of quantitative easing, or money printing) from the central banks.  The table below summarizes the second-quarter and year-to-date (YTD) performance for selected indices.

Source: Bloomberg. Please see important disclosures at the end of this commentary.

“History May Not Repeat Itself, But It Often Rhymes”1

Over the past decade, financial market participants have become conditioned to associate extraordinary monetary policies and central bank liquidity with higher asset prices.  This has in turn led to heightened speculation, as reflected in the surge of recent IPOs with negative earnings and the increasing number of “zombie companies” (companies whose interest expenses are larger than their earnings) in the market.  The result has been tremendous asset price inflation and steep valuations as prices have well outpaced the fundamentals.

Most investors are familiar with the concept of P/E (price-to-earnings) ratios as a reflection of stock market valuations.  When a stock goes up in price, it either does so as a result of improving fundamentals (i.e., increasing earnings) or based upon investor sentiment or expectations.  If the latter is the case, that stock is said to appreciate because of multiple, or P/E, expansion.  As illustrated in the chart below, in the current stagnant earnings growth environment, P/E ratio expansion has accounted for 92% of the year-to-date rally in the U.S. equity market.  Goldman Sachs research indicates that P/E expansion has also been responsible for nearly 30% of the bull market return since March of 2009.

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1 Attributed to Mark Twain

S&P 500 Price Return Attribution

Source:  FactSet, Goldman Sachs Investment Research

Given the headwinds mentioned above, it is unreasonable to expect either earnings growth or multiple expansion to continue at such a pace, which suggests that investors cannot expect such strong returns over the next several years. In our opinion, central bank liquidity, low interest rates and passive investing in mega-cap U.S. growth stocks have pulled forward future investment returns.  We concede that no one can accurately predict the timing of an economic recession or stock market decline.  What we can do, however, is identify environments where investors face heightened risks and adjust our portfolios accordingly.  If equity market valuations revert to historical norms, investors who are only relying on traditional assets to meet their goals may face a very challenging path forward.  Our approach is to mix in strategies that exhibit less dependence on global economic growth in an attempt to provide more consistent returns for our clients in an otherwise uncertain world.

Please do not hesitate to contact your Morton Capital wealth advisory team if you have any questions or would like to review your portfolio or financial plan in more detail.  As always, we appreciate your continued confidence and trust.

Morton Capital Investment Team

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Disclosure Update

MCM recently filed an amendment to its Form ADV Brochure with the Securities and Exchange Commission to reflect some material changes since our last filing in March. Please click the link for a full copy of the amended ADV Brochure:
https://mortoncapital.egnyte.com/dl/vn7uYGXjaY.

This commentary is mailed quarterly to our clients and friends and is for information purposes only.  This document should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any individual security or asset class, and should not be considered investment advice. This memorandum expresses the views of the author and are subject to change without notice. All information contained herein is current only as of the earlier of the date hereof and the date on which it is delivered by Morton Capital (MC) to the intended recipient, or such other date indicated with respect to specific information. Certain information contained herein is based on or derived from information provided by independent third-party sources. The author believes that the sources from which such information has been obtained are reliable; however, it cannot guarantee the accuracy of such information. Any performance information contained herein is for illustrative purposes only.

Certain private investment opportunities discussed herein may only be available to eligible clients and can only be made after careful review and completion of applicable offering documents. Private investments are speculative and involve a high degree of risk.

The indices referenced in this document are provided to allow for comparison to well-known and widely recognized asset classes and asset class categories. Q2 returns shown are from 03-31-2019 through 06-28-2019 and the year-to-date returns are from 12/31/2018 through 06-28-2018.  Index returns shown do not reflect the deduction of any fees or expenses. The volatility of the benchmarks may be materially different from the performance of MC.  In addition, MC’s recommendations may differ significantly from the securities that comprise the benchmarks.  Indices are unmanaged, and an investment cannot be made directly in an index.

Indices:

Past performance is not indicative of future results.  All investments involve risk including the loss of principal. Details on MC’s advisory services, fees and investment strategies, including a summary of risks surrounding the strategies, can be found in our Form ADV Part 2A. A copy may be obtained at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

Mid Quarter Newsletter May 2019

The Return of Trade Tensions

It’s hard to believe that it’s been over a year since President Trump launched us into a trade war with China. (We first delved into this issue in our second quarter 2018 client letter here.) While it appeared that progress was being made in negotiations toward the end of 2018, the recent breakdown in trade talks and escalation in tensions once again has this topic dominating news cycles.

As a quick reminder, a tariff is a tax specifically related to imports and exports that encourages consumers to buy less of the taxed good (whose price has now risen) and more of a cheaper, untaxed alternative. Effectively, a government imposes tariffs to try and benefit domestic producers by making imported goods relatively more expensive. There is much debate, however, regarding whether or not domestic producers truly benefit—for example,  U.S. farmers are actually among those most likely to suffer from the tariffs imposed to date.

Why are tariffs and the ominous-sounding trade war such big news? From all the hubbub, you might expect this to be a disaster for economic growth. The reality, however, is that the broad economy isn’t expected to take a big hit, even if the situation continues to escalate. Capital Economics estimates that the drag on the U.S. and China’s gross domestic product (GDP) will be minimal: around 0.4% for China, and 0.1-0.2% for the U.S. The effects, however, may be harsher on confidence and on financial markets. The uncertainty surrounding the tariffs and the lack of visibility regarding future escalations may cause businesses worldwide to limit investments and encourage consumers to become more cautious with their spending.

Free trade has been a major boost to global growth over the last several decades, with exports accounting for roughly 23% of the global GDP. Protectionist policies in the U.S. and abroad may threaten global growth going forward. Still, as precarious as the situation sounds, it’s only one of many uncertainties facing markets going forward. It’s important for investors to remain disciplined in their approach and stick to their financial plans, even when news cycles get a little feisty.

Welcome Olivia and Elana

Olivia Payne, Client Service Administrator

Olivia joined Morton Capital in April 2019. She brings with her 7 years of customer service experience in retail and social services. Olivia is originally from Georgia, where she attended the University of Georgia and obtained her degree in human development and family science. She is passionate about helping people make choices to improve their lives and learning as much as she can along the way. Olivia enjoys traveling and experiencing the different ways in which other cultures choose to enjoy life.

Elana Yaffe, Paraplanner

Elana Yaffe joined Morton Capital in February 2019 as a Paraplanner, where she collaborates with the advisory team to analyze and prepare financial plans. Prior to Morton Capital, she worked at Merrill Lynch as a seasonal client associate and at American Financial Network as a Paraplanner. Elana graduated with a degree in retailing and consumer sciences from the University of Arizona. She loves to travel, watch sports, and play with animals, especially with her shihtzu, Brandy, and boxer, Sunshine.

Meet the MC Team

Say Hello to Audriana Rex!

Kevin Rex, one of our Lead Wealth Advisors, and his wife, Nicole, welcomed their third child, Audriana, on April 12, a beautiful and healthy baby girl. A big congratulations to their growing family!

Best Places to Work for Financial Advisors Award

We are proud to announce we were named one of the Best Places to Work for Financial Advisors by InvestmentNews. This list highlights the top 75 firms nationwide in the financial advice industry. We were chosen 2nd among firms our size and 16th overall for our commitment to creating a firm culture that encourages idea-sharing and empowers employees to get the most life out of their career. Thank you to our amazing team for making Morton Capital a great place to work every day.

Read the full article by Investment News here

Be Careful Out There: Cybersecurity Tips

By Eric Selter, Chief Compliance Officer

As Elmer Fudd would say: “You should be vewy, vewy afwaid.”

Cybersecurity is a huge topic today. And it should be. The fraudsters are smart and persistent. If they put half as much time into doing good things as they do thinking up ways to steal your information, the world would be a much better place.

Recently, the Morton Capital team sat in on a cybersecurity seminar. Here are some important takeaways that we wanted to share:

* Your data is out there. Don’t think it’s not! Fraudsters can easily buy your personal data on the dark web. Have you ever used Yelp? Believe it or not, there are Yelp ratings for fraudsters on the dark web—that’s how prevalent it has become. Features like two-factor authentication, DocuSign, secure email links and other advanced security tools are useful in helping to prevent some of the more basic security breaches.

* It’s not just you they’re after. While individuals continue to be targets, the fraudsters are now coming after businesses too in order to mine the data they collect from their clients. Have you heard the financial expression, “Cash is king?” Now, data is KING!

* Prevention is key! Some debate the value of credit protection and monitoring services, but any potential alert that someone has opened an account in your name could help you nip fraud in the bud. One example of how to protect yourself: go to your mobile carrier’s website and change your settings so that any call forwarding must be done from your phone and not via their website, which can be hacked.A typical scheme that cybersecurity firms often see, which illustrates the depth of the potential fraud, goes like this: Fraudsters hack your email and see you’re in the process of buying a house (who doesn’t have dozens of emails back and forth with their realtor or escrow officer?). Since they can tell you’ve already warned us that you’ll need some cash for the closing, they send us an email that provides wire instructions to a fake account. Without verbal verification on both sides (you verbally verifying the escrow wire instructions with a trusted escrow officer; us verbally confirming the information with you), money can easily be lost forever.

To safeguard our clients against this common type of fraud, Morton Capital will continue to verbally verify and confirm all new money transfer requests. We know this extra step may be a hassle, but it’s for all of our protection. It’s better to spend some time up front preventing transfer fraud than trying to recover funds after they’ve transferred out. At the risk of dating myself, I’ll end with the line that Captain Esterhaus from Hill Street Blues would say at the start of every shift: LET’S BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!

 

GET THE MOST LIFE OUT OF YOUR WEALTH (SM)

 

Quarterly Insights – Q1 2019

Federal Reserve to the Rescue

How would you expect the stock market to perform in a country experiencing slowing GDP growth, disappointing retail sales and a negative corporate earnings outlook?  There is a wide range of possible answers, but the most obvious choice certainly would not be that stocks would experience their best quarterly performance in a decade.  Yet that is exactly what occurred with the U.S. stock market (S&P 500 Index), up 13.7% in the first quarter.  To add to the perplexity, this stellar performance comes on the heels of a fourth-quarter rout in stocks, where major indices declined almost 20% from their peaks.  When looking to the economic fundamentals for answers, they do not appear to be either weak or strong enough to warrant these kinds of drastic moves.

So if the economic data was neither bad nor good enough to result in such sharp swings, what was the culprit?  The below chart shows the stock market’s recent performance against the backdrop of the Federal Reserve’s (“Fed”) drastic change in interest rate policy:

Based on how the stock market reacted to comments made by the Fed, the clear conclusion is that the stock market has become dependent upon low interest rates (i.e., low borrowing costs) to drive it higher.  When rates rose sharply in the fourth quarter, the market swooned, only to recover when the Fed made a U-turn on policy following weaker than expected

economic data.  Instead of the planned, steady increases in interest rates, the Fed is now promising to be more “patient” with interest rate increases.  While it seems counterintuitive, we are in an environment where bad economic news is perceived as a positive sign for stocks since

it will give Fed policymakers an excuse to keep interest rates lower for longer.  Lower interest rates mean cheaper borrowing costs for companies and consequently higher profits.

Investor Whipsaw

While we normally summarize index performance in a table format, we feel that the below bar chart comparing the performance in Q4 2018 to Q1 2019 better illustrates the recent whipsaw that investors have experienced across most major asset classes:

This information is for illustrative purposes only and not indicative of any investment.  Past performance is no guarantee of future results.  All indexes are unmanaged, and an investment cannot be made directly in an index. Index returns do not include fees and expenses. Please see disclosures at end of this commentary for general definitions of indices.

Given the strong recovery in stocks in the first quarter, stock valuations have skyrocketed back up to near all-time highs.  The below chart looks at the average price-to-sales ratio, which compares a company’s stock price to its revenue, for stocks in the S&P 500 Index. It clearly indicates how expensive stocks have become.

Source: Bloomberg. P/S Ratio: Market Value per Share / Sales per Share

Yield Environment

With stock valuations disconnected from the fundamentals and bond yields back down in the basement, where can investors find returns with reasonable levels of risk?  In our fourth quarter client communication, we discussed our core beliefs as they pertain to managing our clients’ portfolios.  When evaluating a new opportunity, these beliefs revolve around risk management (properly evaluating the risk/return tradeoff), true diversification (finding drivers of return that are significantly different than what we already own), and adequate cash flow, especially in the current low-interest-rate environment.  These tenets hold firm not only during the market volatility of the fourth-quarter, but even in strong recovery periods like early 2019, when investor “FOMO” (fear of missing out) is naturally at its strongest.

In recent years, these beliefs have steered us toward opportunities in the private lending space, specifically in cash-flow-focused assets with adequate collateral.  We recently approved a new strategy in this space that looks to provide capital for social infrastructure projects related to private nonprofits, 501(c)(3) organizations and other entities authorized to issue private activity and tax-exempt bonds.  Consistent with our thesis in other private lending strategies, this strategy takes advantage of the supply/demand imbalance in the marketplace for creditworthy loans.  The regulatory and market changes in the aftermath of the financial crisis have created a capital shortage in these segments of the market, and, consequently, those willing to lend in the space can command higher yields and stronger collateral and controls.  Examples of these market segments include:

 Source:  Tortoise

There are meaningful demographic trends supporting growth in these segments, which disconnects them somewhat from the performance of the broader economy.  Therefore, we believe these segments of the market are relatively recession-proof and unaffected by stock and bond market dynamics, making them particularly attractive in the current environment.  The social nature of the projects also allows them to qualify for tax-exempt status in most cases, and the fund manager expects the majority of the income generated to be federally tax-free.

While the majority of funds in the private lending space are private vehicles, this strategy will be offered in a mutual fund structure where there are quarterly liquidity windows as opposed to daily liquidity.  The less liquid nature of the strategy is what allows investors to capture the illiquidity premium associated with investing in these private securities.  Investors are essentially trading market exposure and risk for illiquidity risk.  We find this tradeoff to be attractive in the current market environment and feel that it makes a lot of sense for certain client portfolios where some level of illiquidity is appropriate for long-term investing.

Please do not hesitate to contact your Morton Capital wealth advisory team if you have any questions or would like to review your portfolio or financial plan in more detail.  As always, we appreciate your continued confidence and trust.

 

Morton Capital Investment Team

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Disclosures:  This commentary is mailed quarterly to our clients and friends and is for information purposes only.  This document should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any individual security or asset class, and should not be considered investment advice. This memorandum expresses the views of the author and are subject to change without notice. All information contained herein is current only as of the earlier of the date hereof and the date on which it is delivered by Morton Capital (MC) to the intended recipient, or such other date indicated with respect to specific information. Certain information contained herein is based on or derived from information provided by independent third-party sources. The author believes that the sources from which such information has been obtained are reliable; however, it cannot guarantee the accuracy of such information. Any performance information contained herein is for illustrative purposes only.

Certain private investment opportunities discussed herein may only be available to eligible clients and can only be made after careful review and completion of applicable offering documents. Private investments are speculative and involve a high degree of risk.

The indices referenced in this document are provided to allow for comparison to well-known and widely recognized asset classes and asset class categories. Q1 returns shown are from 12-31-2018 through 03-31-2019 and the Q4 2018 returns are from 09/28/2018 through 12-31-2018.  Index returns shown do not reflect the deduction of any fees or expenses. The volatility of the benchmarks may be materially different from the performance of MCM.  In addition, MCM’s recommendations may differ significantly from the securities that comprise the benchmarks.  Indices are unmanaged, and an investment cannot be made directly in an index.

  Indices:

U.S Large Co Stocks: S&P 500 Index                                              U.S. Gov’t 1-3 Yr Bond: Barclays U.S. 1-3 Yr Treasury Bond Index

U.S. Small Co. Stocks: Russell 2000 Index                                    Commodities: Bloomberg Commodity Index

Developed Int’l Stocks: MSCI EAFE Index                                     Emerging Market Int’l Stocks MSCI EM Index

U.S. Bonds: Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index                        US Large Value: Russell 1000 Value Index

U.S. Large Growth: Russell 1000 Growth Index

Past performance is not indicative of future results.  All investments involve risk including the loss of principal. Details on MCM’s advisory services, fees and investment strategies, including a summary of risks surrounding the strategies, can be found in our Form ADV Part 2A. A copy may be obtained at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

Mid Quarter Newsletter March 2019

Why Cash Flow Planning Is Important for Everyone

According to a Fidelity eAdvisor study, clients who have a formal financial plan are 7 times happier than those without one. Yes, you read that right—7 times happier! But, according to Charles Schwab’s 2018 Modern Wealth Index study, only one in four Americans actually has a written financial plan. If having a formal, written financial plan could make you 7 times happier, why is it that only a quarter of Americans have one?

People may think that either they don’t have enough money for a cash flow plan or they have more than enough to retire so they don’t need to do one. However, a cash flow plan is not about how much money you have—it’s about providing you with clarity and context when it comes to your finances.

Clarity

At its heart, a financial plan is about helping you use your resources to achieve your goals. But in order to achieve your goals, you need to spend some time clearly defining what they are. Understanding what is important to you can help you make decisions about what you want to do with your money, especially if you need to prioritize your goals. Defining your goals as part of the cash flow planning process will also help your financial professional identify the possible risks to those goals and help you plan for them. The sense of organization and control that a plan can give you has an enormous impact not just on how you feel about your financial life, but about your overall life as well.

Context

Rather than making financial decisions in a vacuum, a cash flow plan provides context for those decisions. Do you need to save more in order to retire when you want to? Should you hold off on selling your business to lessen your tax bill in a high-income year? How will refinancing your mortgage affect your budget? Having a cash flow plan will allow you to see the impact of your decisions before you make them and whether there’s a better alternative that is more in line with your goals.

A plan that provides clarity and context for your financial future is something from which everyone can benefit, regardless of net worth. Going through the process of creating a cash flow plan can seem like an arduous task, but what you’re ultimately working toward is peace of mind.

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Welcome Patrice and Moriah

Patrice Bening started her career in banking at Bank of America while earning her degree in business administration and finance at California State University, Northridge. During the 10 years she spent at Bank of America, she held a variety of positions – from business banker, to relationship client manager, to branch manager, working in diverse markets across the Westside, beach communities and Conejo Valley. Patrice’s latest role was as the Vice President and Branch Manager of the Santa Monica branch for OneWest Bank, a locally based California bank. Patrice is an avid runner and hiker, and last year summited Mt. Whitney and completed her first marathon. Patrice and her husband have two boys and a mischievous border collie named Loki.

Moriah Twombley graduated with a degree in patisserie and baking from Le Cordon Bleu in 2011. After graduating, she worked in retail management before joining Morton Capital in November 2018. As an Account Servicing Associate, Moriah plays an integral role in our operations team by providing administrative support between our client service team and Morton Capital’s various custodians. She still enjoys baking for friends and family.

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FOMO and the Market

Fear of missing out, or FOMO, was the dominant theme for the first nine months of last year and has become an increasingly influential emotion in our daily lives. According to Wikipedia, FOMO is defined as “a pervasive apprehension that others might be having rewarding experiences from which one is absent.” A fear of missing out has always been a part of life, but it has become even more prevalent with the advent of technology and the emergence of social media. The impact on investment strategies has been especially pronounced. For most of 2018, we were constantly reminded how well FAANG (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Google) or other mega-cap growth stocks—which dominate the S&P 500 Index—were doing and why everyone needed to abandon their diversified portfolios and get more exposure to those stocks. Unfortunately, FOMO is frequently a counterproductive emotion that leads to bad decision-making, as it became apparent with the sharp drawdown in the equity markets in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Investment fads are nothing new. A look back over the past few decades can demonstrate how many of these investment strategies have come and gone. In the late 1990s, growing belief in the emergence of a “new economy” led to the rise of the information technology sector and the ensuing speculation in “dot-com” stocks. In the 2000s, much was made about the potential growth opportunities in the emerging economies and the importance of the so-called “BRIC” countries of Brazil, Russia, India, and China. The meteoric rise and subsequent crash of Bitcoin and other so-called cryptocurrencies was the most recent example of irrational FOMO behavior that punished many investors and speculators. While some of these ideas had merit at the time, over-allocating to the hottest and newest investment strategy has rarely paid off in the long run. At Morton Capital, we take a different path when evaluating new investment strategies. Rather than following the crowd, we try to stay disciplined and adhere to our three core beliefs of risk management, true diversification and cash flow. After all, if our clients can sleep peacefully at night knowing their portfolio is working towards their financial goals, while others may take unnecessary risks to participate in a hot trend, who’s really missing out?

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Important Reports for Tax Planning

It’s that time of the year again – tax planning season! To help you and your CPA get the information you need in a timely manner, we’ve created a few tax planning reports on the portal:

  • Realized Gain/Losses – for this year and last year
  • K-1 estimated timing document
  • Estimated income report (under “Transactions”)

We will upload your Schwab or Fidelity 1099 reports in mid-March as well. Please reach out to your MC wealth advisory team for any questions about our portal or to set up your CPA with their own.

 

GET THE MOST LIFE OUT OF YOUR WEALTH (SM)

Fourth Quarter 2018 Commentary

What a Difference a Year Makes

While the stock market correction in the fourth quarter dominated headlines, the real news in 2018 was that the vast majority of asset classes produced negative returns. According to a Deutsche Bank study, 90% of the 70 asset classes they track delivered negative returns for 2018—the highest percentage as far back as 1901, when they began tracking the data. This is in stark contrast to the prior year when almost all asset classes had positive returns.

While these extremes in performance are dramatic, the most important takeaway, in our opinion, is that most traditional asset classes moved in the same direction in both years. We have often talked about the ineffective diversification that traditional (i.e., stock and bond only) portfolios have provided in recent years and may potentially provide going forward. This lack of diversification benefit is welcomed by investors in years like 2017, when everything is up, but less so in years like 2018, where everything is down without there really being anywhere to hide.

The Dual Narratives of 2018

Looking more closely at 2018’s performance, two polar opposite narratives dominated the beginning and the end of the year. The U.S. markets began 2018 with high hopes that tax reform and deregulation would drive an acceleration in the rate of capital investment, thus improving productivity and bolstering economic growth and corporate earnings outlooks. According to Bloomberg, while tax reform has been positive on the margin for capital spending, a large share of the tax windfall has been allocated to corporate share repurchases (i.e., financial engineering). While tax cuts contributed to the rally in the first nine months of the year, it was short-lived as earnings slowed as a result of the lack of investment in productivity. Most indices severely corrected in the fourth quarter and ended the year down or flat. The one bright spot for in the quarter was gold, which acted as an effective hedge during this period of market stress. The table below summarizes the fourth quarter and year-to-date (YTD) performance for selected indices.

We have frequently been asked to comment on what caused the U.S. market’s swoon in the fourth quarter. There was certainly no shortage of potential problem areas: the Fed raised interest rates by 25 basis points (0.25%) for the fourth time in the year, trade tensions with China continued, global economies started showing signs of slowing down, the Democrats took control of the House but the Republicans maintained their majority in the Senate, the White House experienced continued personnel turnover, and there was even a partial government shutdown late in December. None of these events, in our opinion, were significant enough to be considered a catalyst for the market downturn, however. Interest rates have been on the rise for the better part of three years, trade tensions dominated headlines for much of the year, and political uncertainty has been evident almost on a daily basis. Rather than pointing to any one event as the cause of the downturn, it seems most likely to us that markets simply got ahead of themselves in 2017 and the first nine months of 2018. Looking forward, we anticipate that there could be further volatility as the stimulus from tax cuts and government spending wanes and both economic and corporate profit growth rates decelerate.

Morton Capital’s Approach

In our year-end communication regarding the recent market volatility, we emphasized our core beliefs as it pertains to developing long-term plans and managing our clients’ portfolios. Undoubtedly, the markets become more difficult to navigate late in the business cycle, as markets search for new equilibrium and more rational valuation levels. Our core beliefs have helped guide us through challenging markets in the past, and we believe will do so again going forward. Our core beliefs encompass the following:

    • Risk Management

    Investors have to take risk to make money, but deciding what type of risk and how much to take given certain environments can be key to long-term success. In the current environment, where we believe valuations are elevated, the key is finding investments where we have conviction that the return potential justifies the risk being taken. Over the last few years, we have been reducing our exposure to traditional asset classes as euphoric investors have bid up prices and chased yields. These allocations have typically gone to more lending-related strategies, where we believe investors can make relatively attractive returns without having to suffer through stock-like volatility. Where appropriate, we have also increased our allocations to private alternative investments, where there can be a premium for taking on illiquidity.

    • True Diversification

    We define a truly diversified portfolio as one with multiple drivers of return. If stocks and bonds have the potential to move in lockstep during a downturn, then a broader and more dynamic alternative approach to diversification is necessary to be effective. While lack of access and due diligence expertise may keep other firms from investing in alternatives, Morton Capital has been at the forefront of incorporating innovative asset classes such as real estate equity, private lending and reinsurance into our clients’ portfolios. These asset classes should not move in lockstep with the market and should better manage risk if we encounter a sustained correction.

    • Cash Flow

    In designing our client portfolios, we have always shown a preference for investments that can generate immediate or reasonably fast cash flow. While long-term buy-and-hold strategies can be successful, we prefer to be paid while we wait. In the current low-interest-rate environment, we have tilted our public stock portfolio to more dividend-paying stocks and have sought higher levels of cash flow in the private lending space as a replacement for traditional low-yielding bonds. We believe these cash flow-focused assets, especially in the private lending space, will generate more attractive and consistent outcomes for our clients while simultaneously supporting their lifestyles.

Follow Your Plan—Reacting Can Hurt Performance

At some point or another, we have all experienced the frustrating gridlock on the 405 or 101 freeways during rush hour. While traffic is slow for everyone, some drivers keep changing lanes hoping to get ahead. We, on the other hand, stay in our lane and end up passing them a little down the road. Given the heightened levels of volatility and the associated uncertainty, it is understandable that emotions may run high, causing investors to make changes to their portfolios. It is widely studied that one of the costliest mistakes investors make is to sell some of their riskier holdings and hope to buy them back later when things get “better.” Dimensional Fund Advisors has performed a study on the returns of the S&P 500 Index from 1990 to the end of 2017 to prove that market timing is a futile practice. As illustrated in the graph below, if investors missed the 25 single best days in the market during this timeframe, their annualized return would have dropped from 9.81% to 4.53%. Such underperformance will undoubtedly have a major adverse impact on an investor’s financial plan.

Forecasting the future path of the markets or the economy is never easy, and we are not in the business of predictions. As your partner and advisor, we can, however, encourage you to stay disciplined and not overreact to short-term volatility in the markets. In developing a plan to meet your financial goals, we have considered your objectives, income, cash flow requirements, and tolerance to assume risk. Maintaining a diversified portfolio and target asset allocations consistent with our philosophy is an important discipline. While there is an urge to want to be active and make changes, the reality is that every decision is an active decision, including a decision not to make changes.

Please do not hesitate to contact your Morton Capital wealth advisory team if you have any questions or would like to review your portfolio or plan in more detail. As always, we appreciate your continued confidence and trust.

Morton Capital Investment Team

 

____________________________________________________

Disclosures: This commentary is mailed quarterly to our clients and friends and is for information purposes only. This document should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any individual security or asset class, and should not be considered investment advice. This memorandum expresses the views of the author and are subject to change without notice. All information contained herein is current only as of the earlier of the date hereof and the date on which it is delivered by Morton Capital (MC) to the intended recipient, or such other date indicated with respect to specific information. Certain information contained herein is based on or derived from information provided by independent third-party sources. The author believes that the sources from which such information has been obtained are reliable; however, it cannot guarantee the accuracy of such information. Any performance information contained herein is for illustrative purposes only.

Certain private investment opportunities discussed herein may only be available to eligible clients and can only be made after careful review and completion of applicable offering documents. Private investments are speculative and involve a high degree of risk.

The indices referenced in this document are provided to allow for comparison to well-known and widely recognized asset classes and asset class categories. Q4 returns shown are from 09-28-2018 through 12-31-2018 and the 2018 Year-To-Date returns are from 12-29-2017 through 12-31-2018. Index returns shown do not reflect the deduction of any fees or expenses. The volatility of the benchmarks may be materially different from the performance of MCM. In addition, MCM’s recommendations may differ significantly from the securities that comprise the benchmarks. Indices are unmanaged, and an investment cannot be made directly in an index.

Past performance is not indicative of future results. All investments involve risk including the loss of principal. Details on MCM’s advisory services, fees and investment strategies, including a summary of risks surrounding the strategies, can be found in our Form ADV Part 2A. A copy may be obtained at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

Quarterly Insights Q2 2018

Quarterly Insights – Q2, 2018

SECOND QUARTER 2018 COMMENTARY 

The first half of 2018 has seen the return of volatility with somewhat uneven end results. While domestic equities (S&P 500 Index) rebounded somewhat in the second quarter, both developed international (MSCI EAFE) and especially emerging markets (MSCI EM Index) suffered losses. “Conservative” core bonds were only down small for the quarter, but are still at a meaningful loss for the year. From a high level, it appears that U.S. stocks are the positive outlier amongst these traditional asset classes. However, when you dig a little deeper, U.S. stocks are also showing signs of strain. Though the S&P 500 Index is up 2.7% for the year, the strong results of only a handful of stocks are masking the mixed performance of the rest. Specifically, if you remove the top 10 performing stocks for the year (most of which are in the technology sector), the S&P 500 would have a negative return. 

There are undoubtedly short-term positives in the economy today: the tax cuts have provided a pickup in economic growth and the labor market continues to be strong. However, the longer-term concerns are still there, including record-high debt (at the government, corporate and consumer levels), as we go into a cycle of increasing interest rates and inflation. 

The table below summarizes the second quarter and year-to-date (YTD) performance for selected indices. 

Index Q218 YTD Large U.S. Companies (S&P 500 Index) 

+3.4% 

+2.7% 

Small U.S. Companies (Russell 2000 Index) 

+7.8% 

+7.7% 

Developed Foreign Markets (MSCI EAFE Index) 

-0.9% 

-2.4% 

Emerging Foreign Markets (MSCI EM Index) 

-7.8% 

-6.6% 

Core U.S. Bonds (Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index) 

-0.2% 

-1.6% 

Catastrophe Bonds (Swiss Re Global Cat Bond Index) 

+1.4% 

+3.2% 

Commodities (BBRG Commodity Index) 

-0.1% 

-0.9% 

Gold Spot (USD/Ounce) 

-5.4% 

-3.8% 

Hedge Funds (HFRI Fund of Funds Composite Index) 

+0.8% 

+1.0% 

Source: Bloomberg. Please see important disclosures at the end of this commentary.

Tariffs – A Historic Perspective

With talks of trade wars and tariffs taking center stage in the past few months, we thought it would be beneficial to provide a brief historic overview of tariffs, the rationale behind them, and whether or not they are effective policy tools. A tariff is simply a tax imposed by a nation on an imported good. This tax, in effect, increases the price of the imported good, thus giving the competing domestic good a relative price advantage. The first tariff ever levied by the U.S. government was the not-so-disguised Tariff Act of 1789. The primary objectives of the Act were to lower the U.S. debt load and to protect manufacturers. These were clearly stated in the Act:

Whereas it is necessary for that support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufacturers, that duties be laid on goods, wares and merchandise . . .”

While on the surface it may seem like tariffs should be pro-growth for the domestic economy, history has shown that it is not that simple. For example, the Tariff Act of 1930—known as the Smoot-Hawley Tariff—increased tariffs at unprecedented rates. The bill, which was signed into law by President Herbert Hoover over many protests from the economists at the time, was designed to protect the U.S. economy and encourage domestic spending. In retaliation, European countries imposed their own tariffs on U.S. goods. This resulted in a trade war that many believe was a major contributing factor leading to the Great Depression.

Are All Trade Deficits Bad? – Goods vs. Services

The current U.S. administration has used our trade deficit as the rationale for why tariffs are necessary to equalize global trade. The argument is that our large trade deficit reflects an uneven playing field in global production where we cannot compete with the subsidized, low-cost producers in countries like China. While there is some logic to this argument, again, it is not that simple. Trade imbalances are not necessarily a reflection of countries’ trade policies, but rather are impacted by a number of macroeconomic factors, such as the relative growth rates of countries, the relative values of currencies, as well as those countries’ savings and investment rates.

It is also important to put the U.S. trade deficit in context, both in terms of its size and nature. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and as illustrated in the below chart, the latest monthly trade deficit figure was $46.2 billion, which translates roughly to only 2.9% of U.S. GDP (gross domestic product) on an annualized basis.

U.S. Trade Balance of Goods and Services vs. GDP – Source: Bloomberg

While all the talk has been of our goods deficit, there has been little focus on the positive part of the picture: namely, our rapidly increasing trade surplus in services. While the U.S. has a trade deficit in goods with numerous countries, it actually enjoys a trade surplus in services with many of those same countries. The chart below shows that this service surplus has more than tripled in the last two decades.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, fred.stloiusfed.org

In fact, service industries now account for over 70% of U.S. jobs. The trend toward service exports reflects our strength as a country in areas such as finance, insurance, sales from intellectual property, and travel and transportation. The current emphasis on bringing back manufacturing jobs seems to be focusing more on fixing our weaknesses rather than capitalizing on our continually growing strength in these service sectors.

MC Client Commentary – July 2018 | 3

We Do Not Predict – We Prepare

The U.S. financial markets’ reaction to the proposed tariffs has so far been somewhat muted. The economic data and company earnings have been relatively strong, so perhaps the markets do not believe the uncertainty associated with these actions will lead to disruptions in the economy. The truth is that no one knows yet what the impact of these policies will be. Our concern is that, ultimately, no one wins in a trade war: global growth is the loser across the board.

While we cannot predict where the financial markets will end up for the year, we do expect more episodic volatility in response to this type of political uncertainty. The reality is that we cannot structure our client portfolios to be immune from this volatility or any future dislocation that may result. What we can do, however, is evaluate risk and overweight those asset classes where we feel we are best being paid for the risk we are taking. Whenever possible, we look to incorporate investments with the ability to generate returns that are not solely reliant upon economic growth or low interest rates for their success. The more varied the drivers of returns in a portfolio, the better we sleep at night.

Please do not hesitate to contact your Morton wealth advisory team if you have any questions or would like to discuss your portfolio in more detail. As always, we appreciate your continued confidence and trust.

Morton Capital Investment Team

 


Disclosures: This commentary is mailed quarterly to our clients and friends and is for information purposes only. This document should not be taken as a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any individual security or asset class, and should not be considered investment advice. This memorandum expresses the views of the author as of the date indicated and such views are subject to change without notice. All information contained herein is current only as of the earlier of the date hereof and the date on which it is delivered by Morton Capital Management (MCM) to the intended recipient, or such other date indicated with respect to specific information. Certain information contained herein is based on or derived from information provided by independent third-party sources. The author believes that the sources from which such information has been obtained are reliable; however, it cannot guarantee the accuracy of such information and has not independently verified the accuracy or completeness of such information. Predictions, projections and forecasts contained herein may not be indicative of actual future events and are subject to change without notice.

Certain private investment opportunities discussed herein may only be available to eligible clients and can only be made after careful review and completion of applicable offering documents. Private investments are speculative and involve a high degree of risk.

The indices referenced in this document are provided to allow for comparison to well-known and widely recognized asset classes and asset class categories. Q2 returns shown are from 03-29-2018 through 06-29-2018 and the 2018 year-to-date returns are from 12-29-2017 through 06-29-2018. Performance shown does not reflect the deduction of any fees. The volatility of the benchmarks may be materially different from the performance of MCM. In addition, MCM’s recommendations may differ significantly from the securities that comprise the benchmarks. Indices are unmanaged, and an investment cannot be made directly in an index.

Past performance is not indicative of future results. All investments involve risk including the loss of principal. Details on MCM’s advisory services, fees and investment strategies, including a summary of risks surrounding the strategies, can be found in our Form ADV Part 2A. A copy may be obtained at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov.

Mid Quarter Newsletter June 2018

Why You Should Care About Rising Interest Rates

Recently, you’ve likely been seeing headlines that breathlessly wonder whether the Federal Reserve will increase interest rates at their next meeting. With what many consider a relatively strong economic environment and higher inflationary expectations, most agree that the Fed will raise rates at least another two times in 2018.

While there are countless ways higher rates may impact the broader economy, individuals will start to feel the impact as well. As a consumer, if you go to buy a car or use any other form of credit, higher rates will affect any loans you take out. If you have an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM), rising interest rates could cause your monthly payments to increase meaningfully.

Individual investors, especially those with more traditional allocations, will also feel the impact in their investment portfolios. Simple bond math states that interest rates and bond prices move in opposite directions. So a holder of a “risk-free” 10-year Treasury bond has lost 2.8% in value in five short months since the beginning of the year . . . not so “risk-free” after all!

Over the last several years at Morton Capital, we’ve consistently reduced our weightings to fixed income strategies that have exposure to rising interest rates, so our bond portfolios look VERY different from those of other traditional wealth managers. When investing in bonds, others point to the fact that traditional bonds have posted positive and predictable returns for decades on end. After all, what has worked in the past should work going forward, right? However, interest rates have been in a steady decline since 1981, so many investment professionals were still napping in their cribs when rates last rose and have little idea of the potential risk lurking in many bond strategies. When considering this risk to traditional bonds, we think it’s crucial to spend the time searching for alternative bond substitutes that can generate predictable returns, even in a rising rate environment. Just because we haven’t seen rising rates for 30+ years, doesn’t mean the next 30 years will look the same.

Welcome Dan and Leah

Dan Charoenrath
Director of Client Operations

As the Director of Client Operations, Dan manages our Account Servicing Team. Prior to joining Morton Capital, he spent five years managing multiple units for Peets Coffee and Tea, overseeing all locations from San Luis Obispo County through Ventura County. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2004.

 

 

Leah Loewenthal
Portfolio Analyst

Leah began her career in the financial industry in 2013 after graduating from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, with a Bachelor of Science degree in animal science. As a portfolio analyst, she provides excellent operational, administrative and client support. She enjoys traveling, being outdoors and coaching youth basketball. She holds Series 7 and Series 66 licenses.

Planning for Incapacity

If you have parents of a certain age, you’ve likely had to start having those uncomfortable conversations about how they and the rest of the family will handle their affairs as they age. At what point should they stop driving? Should they consider downsizing to a more manageable home? What are their preferences if they need help with their personal care? While thinking about these issues regarding your parents is uncomfortable enough, have you also started thinking about your own incapacity plan? No one wants to think about the day they no longer have the ability to make rational, coherent choices, but being proactive will ensure you have a say in your lifestyle even if you can no longer make day-to-day decisions.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s accounts for most cases of dementia and affects an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older. Other common causes of dementia include strokes, abnormal brain chemistry, and Parkinson’s disease. Some of the warning signs of dementia include memory loss that disrupts daily life, difficulty completing familiar tasks at home or work, confusion with time or place, new problems with words in speaking or writing, and changes in mood or personality.

So how can you plan for the possibility of dementia or other incapacitating disability? Be proactive by identifying someone you trust to make decisions for you when you can’t, and to serve as a resource for your advisors and other professionals. You can use the following form to add a “trusted contact” to your Schwab or Fidelity accounts – simply complete and sign the form and return it to Morton Capital. Encourage your parents to do this as well. Take the time now to make sure you have a durable power of attorney for your financial affairs and an advance health care directive, and revisit any directives you have already to ensure they are still consistent with your wishes.

If there’s someone you would like us to contact in case you begin showing signs of incapacity, reach out to your advisory team and let us know. Introduce this person to other trusted professionals in your life as well. Unfortunately, if you don’t make your incapacity choices yourself, someone else will get to decide who will make those choices for you.

Mid Quarter Newsletter Q2 2017

Our Legacy of Stewardship

In reflecting on Lon’s rich legacy, no part of his work was more important to him than being the trusted steward of his clients’ financial futures. Stewardship is defined as the responsible management of something entrusted to one’s care. It is a position we hold in the highest regard. Beyond our charge of helping clients with financial planning and investments, our most important role is to be a trusted partner available to you and your family for any questions or needs.

Prior to Lon’s passing, he shared with clients that he was excited to unveil the updated brand and image for Morton Capital. Over the next few months we will be completing the project we started with Lon, including the below video on our stewardship philosophy. This is one of a series of five videos and outlines how we see our role as your trusted steward.

How Is Your Financial Professional Getting Paid?

Back in 1983, when Lon founded Morton Capital, the financial investment landscape largely revolved around selling products. The more products financial professionals sold you, the more commissions (read: money) they made. Charging only a single fee based on a client’s assets under management (AUM) was extremely rare, if unheard of. However, Lon saw early on that the only way to truly align himself with clients’ best interests was to be paid for his objective advice and not based upon how many products he was able to sell to them.

Today, it is much more common for advisors to be “fee-only” as opposed to charging commissions.  The challenge with the “fee-only” title, though, is that it may not tell the full story. For instance, an advisor at a brokerage firm may not directly receive commissions, but that individual may still be incentivized to make money for the firm as opposed to their clients. Brokerage firms are notorious for making fees in a myriad of ways, and in many instances, clients can’t see these fees anywhere on their statements. In a Wall Street Journal article published in 2014, it was found that individual investors trading $100,000 in municipal bonds over the course of one month paid brokers an average “spread,” or markup, of 1.73%, or $1,730. In today’s low-interest-rate environment, this could amount to an entire year’s worth of interest. Brokers could also be getting kickbacks from mutual fund companies to recommend their funds to clients. Again, these incentives don’t show up anywhere on client statements, but the concern is that those funds were selected based on the broker’s compensation rather than solely on their appropriateness for clients.

It’s essential to understand how financial professionals are paid in order to find out what factors could be guiding their decision-making. At Morton, we don’t get paid incentives for recommending any of our investments to you. Paramount to our process is getting to know you and your needs and goals first, then making recommendations based solely on what we believe is best for you. Just as Lon envisioned when he decided to create an advisory firm all those years ago, this approach puts the focus back where it belongs: on the best interests of the client.

ETFs and the Illusion of Diversification

With the recent proliferation of ETFs (exchange-traded funds, or vehicles that track indices or a basket of assets), investors are better able to get instant diversification and cost effectively purchase hundreds of stocks in one fell swoop. However, as ETFs have grown as a percentage of total stock market ownership, an unexpected result has emerged; namely, a positive feedback loop has developed as individual stocks now move up and down in lockstep fashion. This makes sense-when you buy an ETF that tracks the S&P 500, you are effectively purchasing all 500 stocks in the S&P index instantaneously, pushing all of their prices up at the same time. Similarly, when you sell that ETF, you are selling all 500 stocks simultaneously, pushing all stock prices down. No surprise that the correlation amongst stocks has moved up meaningfully in recent years. Just when you thought you “won” the diversification game by buying that ETF, you now simply own a bunch of stocks that move up and down together. This behavior will be further exacerbated in a nasty market environment (think 2008) as investors at large will sell their ETFs at a push of a keyboard button, thereby selling thousands of individual stocks in unison.

The age-old solution to diversifying beyond stocks is to add bonds to your portfolio mix. After all, bonds typically behave well during periods of stock market volatility. However, while the last 30+ years have seen falling interest rates and rising bond prices, our concern is that the next 30 years may be a mirror image, with rising rates and poor bond performance. In future stock market dislocations, we believe bonds may not act as the ballast in the portfolio that they were in the past.

Given the heightened political uncertainty in the developed world, coupled with extremely high valuations across most asset classes, we strongly believe an alternative approach toward diversification is essential. Morton Capital is a thought leader in this realm, having taken a unique approach toward diversification for decades. Fundamentally, most traditional asset classes are exposed to three main factors: 1) valuations (we live in a world of expensive valuations); 2) GDP growth (growth around the world is stagnant); and 3) interest rates (trading at all-time historical lows). It may sound counterintuitive, but we seek (rather than avoid) risk exposure to other areas of the economy to curate a well-diversified portfolio. In other words, we crave exposure to asset classes that will behave differently than stocks and bonds in a variety of market environments. Examples include exposure to reinsurance (natural disasters), alternative lending, and gold. Additional examples, where applicable for clients who can access illiquid vehicles, are private lending, real estate, and royalty streams. While investors at large are extremely complacent, as evidenced by very low volatility levels in the global markets, complacency is one risk that we aggressively seek to avoid as we are never satisfied in our search for truly alternative sources of return.

Information contained herein is for educational purposes only and does not constitute an offer to sell or solicitation to buy any security. Some alternative investment opportunities discussed may only be available to eligible clients and involve a high degree of risk. Additionally, the fees and expenses charged on these investments may be higher than those of other investments. Any investment strategy involves the risk of loss of capital. Past performance does not guarantee future results.