Mid Quarter Newsletter June 2018

Why You Should Care About Rising Interest Rates

Recently, you’ve likely been seeing headlines that breathlessly wonder whether the Federal Reserve will increase interest rates at their next meeting. With what many consider a relatively strong economic environment and higher inflationary expectations, most agree that the Fed will raise rates at least another two times in 2018.

While there are countless ways higher rates may impact the broader economy, individuals will start to feel the impact as well. As a consumer, if you go to buy a car or use any other form of credit, higher rates will affect any loans you take out. If you have an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM), rising interest rates could cause your monthly payments to increase meaningfully.

Individual investors, especially those with more traditional allocations, will also feel the impact in their investment portfolios. Simple bond math states that interest rates and bond prices move in opposite directions. So a holder of a “risk-free” 10-year Treasury bond has lost 2.8% in value in five short months since the beginning of the year . . . not so “risk-free” after all!

Over the last several years at Morton Capital, we’ve consistently reduced our weightings to fixed income strategies that have exposure to rising interest rates, so our bond portfolios look VERY different from those of other traditional wealth managers. When investing in bonds, others point to the fact that traditional bonds have posted positive and predictable returns for decades on end. After all, what has worked in the past should work going forward, right? However, interest rates have been in a steady decline since 1981, so many investment professionals were still napping in their cribs when rates last rose and have little idea of the potential risk lurking in many bond strategies. When considering this risk to traditional bonds, we think it’s crucial to spend the time searching for alternative bond substitutes that can generate predictable returns, even in a rising rate environment. Just because we haven’t seen rising rates for 30+ years, doesn’t mean the next 30 years will look the same.

Welcome Dan and Leah

Dan Charoenrath
Director of Client Operations

As the Director of Client Operations, Dan manages our Account Servicing Team. Prior to joining Morton Capital, he spent five years managing multiple units for Peets Coffee and Tea, overseeing all locations from San Luis Obispo County through Ventura County. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2004.

 

 

Leah Loewenthal
Portfolio Analyst

Leah began her career in the financial industry in 2013 after graduating from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, with a Bachelor of Science degree in animal science. As a portfolio analyst, she provides excellent operational, administrative and client support. She enjoys traveling, being outdoors and coaching youth basketball. She holds Series 7 and Series 66 licenses.

Planning for Incapacity

If you have parents of a certain age, you’ve likely had to start having those uncomfortable conversations about how they and the rest of the family will handle their affairs as they age. At what point should they stop driving? Should they consider downsizing to a more manageable home? What are their preferences if they need help with their personal care? While thinking about these issues regarding your parents is uncomfortable enough, have you also started thinking about your own incapacity plan? No one wants to think about the day they no longer have the ability to make rational, coherent choices, but being proactive will ensure you have a say in your lifestyle even if you can no longer make day-to-day decisions.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s accounts for most cases of dementia and affects an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older. Other common causes of dementia include strokes, abnormal brain chemistry, and Parkinson’s disease. Some of the warning signs of dementia include memory loss that disrupts daily life, difficulty completing familiar tasks at home or work, confusion with time or place, new problems with words in speaking or writing, and changes in mood or personality.

So how can you plan for the possibility of dementia or other incapacitating disability? Be proactive by identifying someone you trust to make decisions for you when you can’t, and to serve as a resource for your advisors and other professionals. You can use the following form to add a “trusted contact” to your Schwab or Fidelity accounts – simply complete and sign the form and return it to Morton Capital. Encourage your parents to do this as well. Take the time now to make sure you have a durable power of attorney for your financial affairs and an advance health care directive, and revisit any directives you have already to ensure they are still consistent with your wishes.

If there’s someone you would like us to contact in case you begin showing signs of incapacity, reach out to your advisory team and let us know. Introduce this person to other trusted professionals in your life as well. Unfortunately, if you don’t make your incapacity choices yourself, someone else will get to decide who will make those choices for you.

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